Alexander Pushkin - Eugene Onegin (Chapter 8) / Евгений Онегин (8 часть)


in English

Days when I came to flower serenely
in Lycee gardens long ago,
and read my Apuleius keenly,
but spared no glance for Cicero;
yes, in that spring-time, in low-lying
secluded vales, where swans were crying,
by waters that were still and clear,
for the first time the Muse came near.
And suddenly her radiance lighted
my student cell: she opened up
the joys of youth, that festal cup,
she sang of childhood's fun, indited
Russia's old glories and their gleams,
the heart and all its fragile dreams.

II

And with a smile the world caressed us:
what wings our first successes gave!
aged Derzhavin1 saw and blessed us
as he descended to the grave.

III

The arbitrary rules of passion
were all the law that I would use;
sharing her in promiscuous fashion,
I introduced my saucy Muse
to roar of banquets, din of brawling,
when night patrol's a perilous calling;
to each and every raving feast
she brought her talents, never ceased,
Bacchante-like, her flighty prancing;
sang for the guests above the wine;
the youth of those past days in line
behind her followed wildly dancing;
among my friends, in all that crowd
my giddy mistress made me proud.

IV

When I defected from their union
and ran far off... the Muse came too.
How often, with her sweet communion,
she'd cheer my wordless way, and do
her secret work of magic suasion!
How often on the steep Caucasian
ranges, Lenora2-like, she'd ride
breakneck by moonlight at my side!
How oft she'd lead me, by the Tauric
seacoast, to hear in dark of night
the murmuring Nereids recite,
and the deep-throated billows' choric
hymnal as, endlessly unfurled,
they praise the Father of the world.

V

But then, oblivious of the city,
its glaring feasts, and shrill events,
in far Moldavia, fit for pity,
she visited the humble tents
of wandering tribesmen; while the ravage
of their society turned her savage,
she lost the language of the gods
for the bleak tongue of boorish clods --
she loved the steppe-land and its singing,
then quickly something changed all this:
look here, as a provincial miss
she's turned up in my garden, bringing
sad meditations in her look,
and, in her hand, a small French book.

VI

Now for the first time she's escorted
into the social whirlabout;
jealously, shyly, I've imported
her steppeland charms into a rout.3
Through the tight ranks -- aristocratic,
military-foppish, diplomatic --
past the grand ladies, see her glide;
she sits down calmly on one side,
admires the tumult and the pressing,
the flickering tones of dress and speech,
the young hostess, towards whom each
new guest is gradually progressing,
while men, all sombre, all the same,
set off the ladies like a frame.

VII

She enjoys the stately orchestration
of oligarchical converse,
pride's icy calm, the combination
of ranks and ages so diverse.
But who stands there, in this selected
assembly, silent and dejected?
All who behold him find him strange.
Faces before him flash and change
like irksome phantoms, null as zero.
Is spleen his trouble, or the dumb
torment of pride? And why's he come?
Who on earth is he? not... our hero?
No doubt about it, it's Eugene.
``How long has he been on the scene?

VIII

Still as he was? has he stopped prancing?
does he still pose, and play the freak?
Now he's returned, what role's he dancing?
what play will he present this week?
For what charade is he apparelled?
Is he a Melmoth, a Childe Harold,
a patriot, a cosmopolite,
bigot or prude? or has he quite
a different mask? is he becoming
someone like you and me, just nice?
At least I'll give him some advice:
to drop all that old-fashioned mumming;
too long he's hoaxed us high and low...''
``You know him, do you?'' ``Yes and no.''

IX

However has he earned so vicious,
so unforgiving a report?
Is it that we've become officious
and prone to censure in our thought;
that fiery souls' headstrong enthusing
appears offensive or amusing
to the complacent and the null;
that wit embarrasses the dull;
that we enjoy equating chatter
with deeds; that dunces now and then
take wing on spite; that serious men
find, in the trivial, serious matter;
that mediocre dress alone
fits us as if it were our own?

X

Blest he who in his youth was truly
youthful, who ripened in his time,
and, as the years went by, who duly
grew hardened to life's frosty clime;
who never learnt how dreamers babble;
who never scorned the social rabble;
at twenty, was a fop inbred,
at thirty, lucratively wed;
at fifty, would prolong the story
by clearing every sort of debt;
who, in good time, would calmly get
fortune, and dignity, and glory,
who all his life would garner praise
as the perfection of our days!

XI

Alas, our youth was what we made it,
something to fritter and to burn,
when hourly we ourselves betrayed it,
and it deceived us in return;
when our sublimest aspiration,
and all our fresh imagination,
swiftly decayed beyond recall
like foliage in the rotting fall.
It's agony to watch the hollow
sequence of dinners stretch away,
to see life as a ritual play,
and with the decorous throng to follow
although one in no manner shares
its views, its passions, or its cares!

XII

To be a butt for the malicious
is agony, if I may speak,
and in the eyes of the judicious
to pass for an affected freak,
or for a lamentable manic,
a monster of the gens Satanic,
or for that Demon4 of my dream.
Onegin -- now once more my theme --
had killed his best friend in a duel;
without a goal on which to fix,
lived to the age of twenty-six;
was finding leisure's vacuum cruel;
and with no post, no work, no wife,
had nothing to employ his life.

XIII

He was the slave of a tenacious,
a restless urge for change of place
(an attribute that's quite vexatious,
though some support it with good grace).
He's gone away and left his village,
the solitude of woods and tillage,
where every day a bloodstained shade
had come to him in field and glade;
started a life of pointless roaming,
dogged by one feeling, only one --
and soon his travels had begun,
as all things did, to bore him; homing,
like Chatsky,5 he arrived to fall
direct from shipboard into ball.

XIV

There came a murmur, for a fleeting
moment the assembly seemed to shake...
that lady the hostess was greeting,
with the grand general in her wake --
she was unhurried, unobtrusive,
not cold, but also not effusive,
no haughty stare around the press,
no proud pretentions to success,
no mannerism, no affectation,
no artifices of the vain...
No, all in her was calm and plain.
She struck one as the incarnation --
Shishkov,6 forgive me: I don't know
the Russian for le comme il faut.

XV

Ladies came over, crossed to meet her,
dowagers smiled as she went by;
and bending deeply down to greet her
men made their bows, and sought her eye;
girls as they passed her spoke less loudly,
and no one in the room so proudly
raised nose and shoulders high and wide
as did the general at her side.
You'd never class her as a beauty;
and yet in her you'd not detect --
rigorously though you'd inspect --
what London calls, with humble duty
to fashion's absolute dictate,
a vulgar touch. I can't translate.

XVI

And yet, although it's past conveying,
I really dote upon the word:
it's new to us, beyond gainsaying;
from the first moment it was heard
it had its epigram-potential7...
But let's return to our essential,
that lady whose engaging charm
so effortlessly can disarm.
She sits with Nina8 at a table --
bright Northern Cleopatra she:
but you'll undoubtedly agree
that marble Nina's proved unable
to steal away her neighbour's light
or dim her, dazzle as she might.

XVII

``Can it be she?'' Eugene in wonder
demanded. ``Yes, she looks... And yet...
from deepest backwood, furthest under...''
And every minute his lorgnette
stays fixed and focused on a vision
which has recalled, without precision,
forgotten features. ``Can you say,
prince, who in that dark-red beret,
just there, is talking to the Spanish
ambassador?'' In some surprise
the prince looks at him, and replies:
``Wait, I'll present you -- but you banish
yourself too long from social life.''
``But tell me who she is.'' ``My wife.''

XVIII

``You're married? No idea whatever...
Since when is this?'' ``Two years or more.''
``To...?'' ``Larina.'' ``Tatyana? never!''
``She knows you?'' ``Why, we lived next door.''
So to his wife for presentation
the prince bring up his own relation
and friend Evgeny. The princess
gazes at him... and nonetheless,
however much her soul has faltered,
however strongly she has been
moved and surprised, she stays serene,
and nothing in her look is altered:
her manner is no less contained;
her bow, as calm and as restrained.

XIX

I don't mean that she never shivered,
paled, flushed, or lost composure's grip --
no, even her eyebrow never quivered,
she never even bit her lip.
However closely he inspected,
there was no trace to be detected
of the old Tatyana. Eugene tried
to talk to her, but language died.
How long he'd been here, was her query,
and where had he arrived from, not
from their own country? Then she shot
across to her consort a weary
regard, and slipped away for good, ...
with Eugene frozen where he stood.

XX

Was she the Tanya he'd exhorted
in solitude, as at the start
of this our novel we reported,
in the far backwoods' deepest heart,
to whom, in a fine flow of preaching,
he had conveyed some moral teaching,
from whom he'd kept a letter, where
her heart had spoken, free as air,
untouched by trace of inhibition,
could it be she... or had he dreamed?
the girl he'd scorned in what he deemed
the modesty of her condition,
could it be she, who just had turned
away, so cool, so unconcerned?

XXI

Eugene forsakes the packed reception,
and home he drives, deep-sunk in thought.
By dreams now sad in their conception,
now sweet, his slumbers are distraught.
He wakes -- and who is this who writes him?
Prince N. respectfully invites him
to a soiree. ``My God! to her!...
I'll go, I'll go!'' -- and in a stir
a swift, polite reply is written.
What ails him? he's in some strange daze!
what moves along the hidden ways
in one so slothful, so hard-bitten?
vexation? vainness? heavens above,
it can't be youth's distemper -- love?

XXII

Once more he counts the hour-bells tolling,
once more he can't await the night;
now ten has struck, his wheels are rolling,
he drives there like a bird in flight,
he's up the steps, with heart a-quiver
led to the princess, all a-shiver,
finds her alone, and there they sit
some minutes long. The words won't fit
on Eugene's lips. In his dejection,
his awkwardness, he's hardly said
a single thing to her. His head
is lost in obstinate reflection;
and obstinate his look. But she
sits imperturbable, and free.

XXIII

Her husband enters, thus concluding
their unattractive tete-a-tete;
he and Onegin start alluding
to pranks and jokes of earlier date.
They laugh. The guests begin arriving.
Already now the talk was thriving
on modish malice, coarse of grain
but salt; near the princess a vein
of unaffectedly fantastic
invention sparkled, then gave way
to reasoned talk, no dull hearsay,
no deathless truths, nothing scholastic;
and no one's ear could take offence
at such vivacious, free good sense.

XXIV

High rank, of course, and fashion's glasses,
Saint Petersburg's fine flower was there --
the inevitable silly asses,
the faces met with everywhere;
ladies of riper years, delicious
in rose-trimmed bonnets, but malicious;
a girl or two, without a smile
to crack between them; for a while
one listened to a chief of mission
on state affairs; there was a wit,
a grey-haired, perfumed exquisite,
a joker in the old tradition,
acute and subtle -- in a word
all that today we find absurd.

XXV

There, with epigrammatic neatness,
was one who raged and raged again,
against the tea's excessive sweetness,
the boring wives, the ill-bred men,
a novel, vague and superficial,
two sisters who'd received the initial,9
the lies that in the press run rife,
the war, the snowfall, and his wife.
... ...

XXVI

There was -- --,10 so notorious
through baseness of the soul that he,
in albums, blunted the censorious
cartoonist-pencils of Saint-Priest;11
another of the ball-dictators,
a fashion-plate for illustrators,
stood in the door, cherubic, mute,
frozen in his tight-fitting suit;
a far-flung traveller who was creaking
with foppery and too much starch,
set the guests smiling at his arch,
affected pose -- and an unspeaking
unanimous exchange of looks
entered his sentence in the books.

XXVII

But my Eugene that night directed
his gaze at Tatyana alone --
not the plain, timorous, dejected
and lovelorn maiden whom he'd known,
but the unbending goddess-daughter
of Neva's proud imperial water,
the imperturbable princess.
We all resemble more or less
our Mother Eve: we're never falling
for what's been given us to take;
to his mysterious tree the snake
is calling us, for ever calling --
and once forbidden fruit is seen,
no paradise can stay serene.

XXVIII

In Tanya, what a transformation!
how well she'd studied her new role!
how soon the bounds of rank and station
had won her loyalty! What soul
would have divined the tender, shrinking
maiden in this superb, unthinking
lawgiver to the modish world?
Yet once for him her thoughts had whirled,
for him, at night, before the indulgence
of Morpheus had induced relief
she once had pined in girlish grief,
raised a dull eye to moon's refulgence,
and dreamt that she with him one day
jointly would tread life's humble way!

XXIX

Love tyrannises all the ages;
but youthful, virgin hearts derive
a blessing from its blasts and rages,
like fields in spring when storms arrive.
In passion's sluicing rain they freshen,
ripen, and find a new expression --
the vital force gives them the shoot
of sumptuous flowers and luscious fruit.
But when a later age has found us,
the climacteric of our life,
how sad the scar of passion's knife:
as when chill autumn rains surround us,
throw meadows into muddy rout,
and strip the forest round about.

XXX

Alas, Eugene beyond all query
is deep in love, just like a boy;
spends light and darkness in the dreary
brooding that is the lover's ploy.
Each day, despite the appeals of reason,
he drives up in and out of season
to her glass porch; pursues her round
close as a shadow on the ground;
and bliss for him is when he hotly
touches her hand, or throws a fur
around her neck, or when for her
he goes ahead and parts the motley
brigade of liveries in the hall,
or else lifts up a fallen shawl.

XXXI

But she refuses to perceive him,
even if he drops or pines away.
At home she'll equably receive him,
in others' houses she may say
a word or two, or stare unseeing,
or simply bow: within her being
coquettishness has got no trace --
the grand monde finds it out of place.
Meanwhile Onegin starts to languish:
she doesn't see, or doesn't mind;
Onegin wastes, you'd almost find
he's got consumption. In his anguish
some vote a doctor for the case,
others prescribe a watering-place.

XXXII

But go he won't: for him, a letter
fixing an early rendezvous
with his forefathers would seem better;
but she (for women, that's not new)
remains unmoved: still he's persistent,
active, and hopeful, and insistent:
his illness lends him courage and
to the princess, in his weak hand,
he sends a letter, penned with passion.
He deemed, in general, letters vain,
and rightly so, but now his pain
had gone in no uncertain fashion
past all endurance. You're referred
to Eugene's letter, word for word.

Onegin's Letter to Tatyana

``I know it all: my secret ache
will anger you in its confession.
What scorn I see in the expression
that your proud glance is sure to take!
What do I want? what am I after,
stripping my soul before your eyes!
I know to what malicious laughter
my declaration may give rise!

``I noticed once, at our chance meeting,
in you a tender pulse was beating,
yet dared not trust what I could see.
I gave no rein to sweet affection:
what held me was my predilection,
my tedious taste for feeling free.
And then, to part us in full measure,
Lensky, that tragic victim, died...
From all sweet things that gave me pleasure,
since then my heart was wrenched aside;
freedom and peace, in substitution
for happiness, I sought, and ranged
unloved, and friendless, and estranged.
What folly! and what retribution!

``No, every minute of my days,
to see you, faithfully to follow,
watch for your smile, and catch your gaze
with eyes of love, with greed to swallow
your words, and in my soul to explore
your matchlessness, to seek to capture
its image, then to swoon before
your feet, to pale and waste... what rapture!

``But I'm denied this: all for you
I drag my footsteps hither, yonder;
I count each hour the whole day through;
and yet in vain ennui I squander
the days that doom has measured out.
And how they weigh! I know about
my span, that fortune's jurisdiction
has fixed; but for my heart to beat
I must wake up with the conviction
that somehow that same day we'll meet...

``I dread your stern regard surmising
in my petition an approach,
a calculation past despising --
I hear the wrath of your reproach.
How fearful, in and out of season
to pine away from passion's thirst,
to burn -- and then by force of reason
to stem the bloodstream's wild outburst;
how fearful, too, is my obsession
to clasp your knees, and at your feet
to sob out prayer, complaint, confession,
and every plea that lips can treat;
meanwhile with a dissembler's duty
to cool my glances and my tongue,
to talk as if with heart unwrung,
and look serenely on your beauty!...

``But so it is: I'm in no state
to battle further with my passion;
I'm yours, in a predestined fashion,
and I surrender to my fate.''

XXXIII

No answer comes. Another letter
he sends, a second, then a third.
No answer comes. He goes, for better
or worse, to a soiree. Unheard
she appears before him, grim and frozen.
No look, no word for him: she's chosen
to encase herself inside a layer
of Twelfth Night's chillest, iciest air.
To batten down their indignation
is all those stubborn lips desire!
Onegin looks with eyes of fire:
where are distress, commiseration?
No tearstains, nothing. Wrath alone
is graven on that face of stone.

XXXIV

Perhaps some secret apprehension
lest signs of casual weakness drew
her husband's or the world's attention...
Ah, all that my Onegin knew...
No hope! no hope! He leaves the revel,
wishes his madness to the devil,
drives home -- and plunging deeper in,
once more renounces world and din.
And he remembers, in the quiet
of his own room, how cruel spleen
had once before, across the scene
of social buzz and modish riot,
tracked him, and put him in duress,
and locked him in a dark recess.

XXXV

Once more he turned to books, unchoosing,
devouring Gibbon and Rousseau,
Manzoni and Chamfort,12 perusing
Madame de Stael, Bichat,13 Tissot,14
Herder, and even at times a Russian --
nothing was barred beyond discussion --
he read of course the sceptic Bayle15
and all the works of Fontanelle16 --
almanacs, journals of reflection,
where admonitions are pronounced,
where nowadays I'm soundly trounced,
but where such hymns in my direction
were chanted, I remember when --
e sempre bene, gentlemen.

XXXVI

What happened? Though his eyes were reading,
his thoughts were on a distant goal:
desires and dreams and griefs were breeding
and swarming in his inmost soul.
Between the lines of text as printed,
his mind's eye focused on the hinted
purport of other lines; intense
was his absorption in their sense.
Legends, and mystical traditions,
drawn from a dim, warm-hearted past,
dreams of inconsequential cast,
rumours and threats and premonitions,
long, lively tales from wonderland,
or letters in a young girl's hand.

XXXVII

Then gradually upon sensation,
and thought, a sleepy numbness steals;
before his eyes, imagination
brings out its faro pack, and deals.
He sees: in slush, stretched out and keeping
motionless as one soundly sleeping
in bed, a young man, stiff and chilled;
he hears a voice; ``well, what? he's killed!''
And foes he sees, long-since forgotten,
a rogue, a slanderer, a poltroon,
young traitresses by the platoon,
comrades despised, and comrades rotten;
a country house -- and one who still
sits there beside the window-sill!

XXXVIII

He got so used to this immersion,
he almost lost his mind, expired,
or joined us poets. His conversion
would have been all that we required!
It's true, the magnet-like attraction
of Russian verse, its force in action, --
my inept pupil, at that hour,
so nearly had them in his power.
Who could have looked the poet better,
as in the nook he'd sit alone
by blazing fireplace, and intone
Idol mio or Benedetta,
and on the flames let fall unseen
a slipper, or a magazine?

XXXIX

The days flew past; by now the season
in warmer airs was half dispersed.
He's neither died, nor lost his reason,
nor turned a poet. In the burst
of spring he lives, he's energetic;
he leaves one morning the hermetic
apartment where a double glaze
has kept him warm in chimney's blaze
while, marmot-like, he hibernated --
along the Neva in a sleigh,
past ice-blocks, blue and squared away,
he drives in brilliant sun; striated
along the street lies dirty snow;
and like an arrow from a bow

XL

over the slush, where is he chasing?
You've guessed before it all began:
to his Tatyana, yes, he's racing,
my strange, incorrigible man.
He goes inside, corpse-like of feature...
the hall's without a living creature,
the big room, further, not a cat.
He opens up a door. What's that
that strikes him with such force and meaning?
The princess, sitting peaked and wan,
alone, with no adornment on;
she holds a letter up, and leaning
cheek upon hand she softly cries
in a still stream that never dries.

XLI

Who in that flash could not have reckoned
her full account of voiceless pain?
Who in the princess for that second
would not have recognized again
our hapless Tanya! An emotion
of wild repentance and devotion
threw Eugene at her feet -- she stirred,
and looked at him without a word,
without surprise or rage... his laden,
his humbly suppliant approach,
his dull, sick look, his dumb reproach --
she sees it all. The simple maiden,
whose heart on dreams was wont to thrive,
in her once more has come alive.

XLII

Tatyana leaves Onegin kneeling,
looks at him with a steady gaze,
allows her hand, that's lost all feeling,
to meet his thirsty lips... What daze,
what dream accounts for her distraction?
A pause of silence and inaction,
then quietly at last says she:
``Enough, stand up. It's now for me
to give you honest explanation.
Onegin, d'you recall the day
when in the park, in the allee
where fate had fixed our confrontation,
humbly I heard your lesson out?
Today it's turn and turn about.

XLIII

``For then, Onegin, I was younger,
and also prettier, I'll be bound,
what's more, I loved you; but my hunger,
what was it in your heart it found
that could sustain it? Only grimness;
for you, I think, the humble dimness
of lovelorn girls was nothing new?
But now -- oh God! -- the thought of you,
your icy look, your stern dissuasion,
freezes my blood... Yet all the same,
nothing you did gave cause for blame:
you acted well, that dread occasion,
you took an honourable part --
I'm grateful now with all my heart.

XLIV

``Then, in the backwoods, far from rumour
and empty gossip, you'll allow,
I'd nothing to attract your humour...
Why then do you pursue me now?
What cause has won me your attention?
Could it not be that by convention
I move in the grand monde? that rank,
and riches, and the wish to thank
my husband for his wounds in battle
earn us the favour of the Court?
that, for all this, my shame's report
would cause widespread remark and tattle,
and so in the salons could make
a tempting plume for you to take?

XLV

``I weep... In case there still should linger
your Tanya's image in your mind,
then know that your reproving finger,
your cold discourse, were less unkind --
if I had power to choose your fashion --
than this humiliating passion
and than these letters, and these tears.
At least you then showed for my years
respect, and mercy for my dreaming.
But now! what brings you to my feet?
What trifling could be more complete?
What power enslaves you, with your seeming
advantages of heart and brain,
to all that's trivial and inane?

XLVI

``To me, Onegin, all this glory
is tinsel on a life I hate;
this modish whirl, this social story,
my house, my evenings, all that state --
what's in them? All this loud parading,
and all this flashy masquerading,
the glare, the fumes in which I live,
this very day I'd gladly give,
give for a bookshelf, a neglected
garden, a modest home, the place
of our first meeting face to face,
and the churchyard where, new-erected,
a humble cross, in woodland gloom,
stands over my poor nurse's tomb.

XLVII

``Bliss was so near, so altogether
attainable!... But now my lot
is firmly cast. I don't know whether
I acted thoughtlessly or not:
you see, with tears and incantation
mother implored me; my sad station
made all fates look the same... and so
I married. I beseech you, go;
I know your heart: it has a feeling
for honour, a straightforward pride.
I love you (what's the use to hide
behind deceit or double-dealing?)
but I've become another's wife --
and I'll be true to him, for life.''

XLVIII

She went -- and Eugene, all emotion,
stood thunder-struck. In what wild round
of tempests, in what raging ocean
his heart was plunged! A sudden sound,
the clink of rowels, met his hearing;
Tatyana's husband, now appearing...
But from the hero of my tale,
just at this crisis of his gale,
reader, we must be separating,
for long... for evermore. We've chased
him far enough through wild and waste.
Hurrah! let's start congratulating
ourselves on our landfall. It's true,
our vessel's long been overdue.

XLIX

Reader, I wish that, as we parted --
whoever you may be, a friend,
a foe -- our mood should be warm-hearted.
Goodbye, for now we make an end.
Whatever in this rough confection
you sought -- tumultuous recollection,
a rest from toil and all its aches,
or just grammatical mistakes,
a vivid brush, a witty rattle --
God grant that from this little book
for heart's delight, or fun, you took,
for dreams, or journalistic battle,
God grant you took at least a grain.
On this we'll part; goodbye again!

L

And my companion, so mysterious,
goodbye to you, my true ideal,
my task, so vivid and so serious
and yet so light. All that is real
and enviable for a poet,
in your pursuit I've come to know it:
oblivion of life's stormy ways,
sweet talk with friends. How many days
since, through the mist that dreams arise on,
young Tanya first appeared to me,
Onegin too -- and there to see,
a free romance's far horizon,
still dim, through crystal's magic glass,
before my gaze began to pass.

LI

Of those who heard my opening pages
in friendly gatherings where I read,
as Sadi17 sang in earlier ages,
``some are far distant, some are dead''.
They've missed Eugene's completed etching.
But she who modelled for the sketching
of Tanya's image... Ah, how great
the toll of those borne off by fate!
Blest he who's left the hurly-burly
of life's repast betimes, nor sought
to drain its beaker down, nor thought
of finishing its book, but early
has wished it an abrupt goodbye --
and, with my Eugene, so have I.

Notes to Chapter Eight

1 Gavrila Derzhavin (1745-1816), ``Russia's first outstanding poet''
(Nabokov). While still at the Lyceum in Tsarskoe Selo, in 1815, Pushkin read
some of his verses to him. The stanza was unfinished.
2 Lenore, romantic ballad by Gottfried August Burger, 1773.
3 ``Rout (Eng.), an evening assembly without dancing; means properly
crowd.'' Pushkin's note.
4 Refers to Pushkin's poem The Demon, of 1823.
5 Hero of Griboedov's Woe from Wit, 1824.
6 Admiral Alexander Shishkov (1754-1841) championed the purity ot the
Russian language against the encroachment of foreign words.
7 Probably an allusion to Bulgarin, an unfriendly critic of Pushkin's
work.
8 Nina Voronskoy, imaginary belle of Petersburg society.
9 Court decoration given to the Empress's ladies-in-waiting. Stanza
unfinished.
10 Name left blank by Pushkin.
11 Count Emmanuel Sen-Pri (1806-1828) had a reputation as a cartoonist.
He was the son of the Comte de Saint-Priest, a French emigre.
12 Author of Maximes et Pensees, Paris, 1796.
13 Author of Recherches physiologiques sur la vie et la mort, Paris,
1799.
14 Author of De la sante des gens de lettres, Lausanne and Lyon, 1768.
15 Pierre Bayle, French philosopher.
16 Author of Dialogues des Morts, 1683.
17 Persian poet of the thirteenth century.

in Russian

В те дни, когда в садах Лицея
Я безмятежно расцветал,
Читал охотно Апулея,
А Цицерона не читал,
В те дни в таинственных долинах,
Весной, при кликах лебединых,
Близ вод, сиявших в тишине,
Являться муза стала мне.
Моя студенческая келья
Вдруг озарилась: муза в ней
Открыла пир младых затей,
Воспела детские веселья,
И славу нашей старины,
И сердца трепетные сны.

II

И свет ее с улыбкой встретил;
Успех нас первый окрылил;
Старик Державин нас заметил
И в гроб сходя, благословил.

III

И я, в закон себе вменяя
Страстей единый произвол,
С толпою чувства разделяя,
Я музу резвую привел
На шум пиров и буйных споров,
Грозы полуночных дозоров;
И к ним в безумные пиры
Она несла свои дары
И как вакханочка резвилась,
За чашей пела для гостей,
И молодежь минувших дней
За нею буйно волочилась,
А я гордился меж друзей
Подругой ветреной моей.

IV

Но я отстал от их союза
И вдаль бежал… Она за мной.
Как часто ласковая муза
Мне услаждала путь немой
Волшебством тайного рассказа!
Как часто по скалам Кавказа
Она Ленорой, при луне,
Со мной скакала на коне!
Как часто по брегам Тавриды
Она меня во мгле ночной
Водила слушать шум морской,
Немолчный шепот Нереиды,
Глубокий, вечный хор валов,
Хвалебный гимн отцу миров.

V

И, позабыв столицы дальной
И блеск и шумные пиры,
В глуши Молдавии печальной
Она смиренные шатры
Племен бродящих посещала,
И между ими одичала,
И позабыла речь богов
Для скудных, странных языков,
Для песен степи, ей любезной…
Вдруг изменилось все кругом,
И вот она в саду моем
Явилась барышней уездной,
С печальной думою в очах,
С французской книжкою в руках.

VI

И ныне музу я впервые
На светский раут 44 привожу;
На прелести ее степные
С ревнивой робостью гляжу.
Сквозь тесный ряд аристократов,
Военных франтов, дипломатов
И гордых дам она скользит;
Вот села тихо и глядит,
Любуясь шумной теснотою,
Мельканьем платьев и речей,
Явленьем медленным гостей
Перед хозяйкой молодою
И темной рамою мужчин
Вкруг дам как около картин.

VII

Ей нравится порядок стройный
Олигархических бесед,
И холод гордости спокойной,
И эта смесь чинов и лет.
Но это кто в толпе избранной
Стоит безмолвный и туманный?
Для всех он кажется чужим.
Мелькают лица перед ним
Как ряд докучных привидений.
Что, сплин иль страждущая спесь
В его лице? Зачем он здесь?
Кто он таков? Ужель Евгений?
Ужели он?.. Так, точно он.
— Давно ли к нам он занесен?

VIII

Все тот же ль он иль усмирился?
Иль корчит также чудака?
Скажите: чем он возвратился?
Что нам представит он пока?
Чем ныне явится? Мельмотом,
Космополитом, патриотом,
Гарольдом, квакером, ханжой,
Иль маской щегольнет иной,
Иль просто будет добрый малый,
Как вы да я, как целый свет?
По крайней мере мой совет:
Отстать от моды обветшалой.
Довольно он морочил свет…
— Знаком он вам? — И да и нет.

IX

— Зачем же так неблагосклонно
Вы отзываетесь о нем?
За то ль, что мы неугомонно
Хлопочем, судим обо всем,
Что пылких душ неосторожность
Самолюбивую ничтожность
Иль оскорбляет, иль смешит,
Что ум, любя простор, теснит,
Что слишком часто разговоры
Принять мы рады за дела,
Что глупость ветрена и зла,
Что важным людям важны вздоры
И что посредственность одна
Нам по плечу и не странна?

X

Блажен, кто смолоду был молод,
Блажен, кто вовремя созрел,
Кто постепенно жизни холод
С летами вытерпеть умел;
Кто странным снам не предавался,
Кто черни светской не чуждался,
Кто в двадцать лет был франт иль хват,
А в тридцать выгодно женат;
Кто в пятьдесят освободился
От частных и других долгов,
Кто славы, денег и чинов
Спокойно в очередь добился,
О ком твердили целый век:
N. N. прекрасный человек.

XI

Но грустно думать, что напрасно
Была нам молодость дана,
Что изменяли ей всечасно,
Что обманула нас она;
Что наши лучшие желанья,
Что наши свежие мечтанья
Истлели быстрой чередой,
Как листья осенью гнилой.
Несносно видеть пред собою
Одних обедов длинный ряд,
Глядеть на жизнь, как на обряд,
И вслед за чинною толпою
Идти, не разделяя с ней
Ни общих мнений, ни страстей.

XII

Предметом став суждений шумных,
Несносно (согласитесь в том)
Между людей благоразумных
Прослыть притворным чудаком,
Или печальным сумасбродом,
Иль сатаническим уродом,
Иль даже демоном моим.
Онегин (вновь займуся им),
Убив на поединке друга,
Дожив без цели, без трудов
До двадцати шести годов,
Томясь в бездействии досуга
Без службы, без жены, без дел,
Ничем заняться не умел.

XIII

Им овладело беспокойство,
Охота к перемене мест
(Весьма мучительное свойство,
Немногих добровольный крест).
Оставил он свое селенье,
Лесов и нив уединенье,
Где окровавленная тень
Ему являлась каждый день,
И начал странствия без цели,
Доступный чувству одному;
И путешествия ему,
Как всё на свете, надоели;
Он возвратился и попал,
Как Чацкий, с корабля на бал.

XIV

Но вот толпа заколебалась,
По зале шепот пробежал…
К хозяйке дама приближалась,
За нею важный генерал.
Она была нетороплива,
Не холодна, не говорлива,
Без взора наглого для всех,
Без притязаний на успех,
Без этих маленьких ужимок,
Без подражательных затей…
Все тихо, просто было в ней,
Она казалась верный снимок
Du comme il faut… (Шишков, прости:
Не знаю, как перевести.)

XV

К ней дамы подвигались ближе;
Старушки улыбались ей;
Мужчины кланялися ниже,
Ловили взор ее очей;
Девицы проходили тише
Пред ней по зале, и всех выше
И нос и плечи подымал
Вошедший с нею генерал.
Никто б не мог ее прекрасной
Назвать; но с головы до ног
Никто бы в ней найти не мог
Того, что модой самовластной
В высоком лондонском кругу
Зовется vulgar. (Не могу…

XVI

Люблю я очень это слово,
Но не могу перевести;
Оно у нас покамест ново,
И вряд ли быть ему в чести.
Оно б годилось в эпиграмме…)
Но обращаюсь к нашей даме.
Беспечной прелестью мила,
Она сидела у стола
С блестящей Ниной Воронскою,
Сей Клеопатрою Невы;
И верно б согласились вы,
Что Нина мраморной красою
Затмить соседку не могла,
Хоть ослепительна была.

XVII

«Ужели, — думает Евгений: —
Ужель она? Но точно… Нет…
Как! из глуши степных селений…»
И неотвязчивый лорнет
Он обращает поминутно
На ту, чей вид напомнил смутно
Ему забытые черты.
«Скажи мне, князь, не знаешь ты,
Кто там в малиновом берете
С послом испанским говорит?»
Князь на Онегина глядит.
— Ага! давно ж ты не был в свете.
Постой, тебя представлю я. —
«Да кто ж она?» — Жена моя. —

XVIII

«Так ты женат! не знал я ране!
Давно ли?» — Около двух лет. —
«На ком?» — На Лариной. — «Татьяне!»
— Ты ей знаком? — «Я им сосед».
— О, так пойдем же. — Князь подходит
К своей жене и ей подводит
Родню и друга своего.
Княгиня смотрит на него…
И что ей душу ни смутило,
Как сильно ни была она
Удивлена, поражена,
Но ей ничто не изменило:
В ней сохранился тот же тон,
Был так же тих ее поклон.

XIX

Ей-ей! не то, чтоб содрогнулась
Иль стала вдруг бледна, красна…
У ней и бровь не шевельнулась;
Не сжала даже губ она.
Хоть он глядел нельзя прилежней,
Но и следов Татьяны прежней
Не мог Онегин обрести.
С ней речь хотел он завести
И — и не мог. Она спросила,
Давно ль он здесь, откуда он
И не из их ли уж сторон?
Потом к супругу обратила
Усталый взгляд; скользнула вон…
И недвижим остался он.

XX

Ужель та самая Татьяна,
Которой он наедине,
В начале нашего романа,
В глухой, далекой стороне,
В благом пылу нравоученья,
Читал когда-то наставленья,
Та, от которой он хранит
Письмо, где сердце говорит,
Где всё наруже, всё на воле,
Та девочка… иль это сон?..
Та девочка, которой он
Пренебрегал в смиренной доле,
Ужели с ним сейчас была
Так равнодушна, так смела?

XXI

Он оставляет раут тесный,
Домой задумчив едет он;
Мечтой то грустной, то прелестной
Его встревожен поздний сон.
Проснулся он; ему приносят
Письмо: князь N покорно просит
Его на вечер. «Боже! к ней!..
О буду, буду!» и скорей
Марает он ответ учтивый.
Что с ним? в каком он странном сне!
Что шевельнулось в глубине
Души холодной и ленивой?
Досада? суетность? иль вновь
Забота юности — любовь?

XXII

Онегин вновь часы считает,
Вновь не дождется дню конца.
Но десять бьет; он выезжает,
Он полетел, он у крыльца,
Он с трепетом к княгине входит;
Татьяну он одну находит,
И вместе несколько минут
Они сидят. Слова нейдут
Из уст Онегина. Угрюмый,
Неловкий, он едва-едва
Ей отвечает. Голова
Его полна упрямой думой.
Упрямо смотрит он: она
Сидит покойна и вольна.

XXIII

Приходит муж. Он прерывает
Сей неприятный tete-a-tete;
С Онегиным он вспоминает
Проказы, шутки прежних лет.
Они смеются. Входят гости.
Вот крупной солью светской злости
Стал оживляться разговор;
Перед хозяйкой легкий вздор
Сверкал без глупого жеманства,
И прерывал его меж тем
Разумный толк без пошлых тем,
Без вечных истин, без педантства,
И не пугал ничьих ушей
Свободной живостью своей.

XXIV

Тут был, однако, цвет столицы,
И знать, и моды образцы,
Везде встречаемые лицы,
Необходимые глупцы;
Тут были дамы пожилые
В чепцах и в розах, с виду злые;
Тут было несколько девиц,
Не улыбающихся лиц;
Тут был посланник, говоривший
О государственных делах;
Тут был в душистых сединах
Старик, по-старому шутивший:
Отменно тонко и умно,
Что нынче несколько смешно.

XXV

Тут был на эпиграммы падкий,
На всё сердитый господин:
На чай хозяйский слишком сладкий,
На плоскость дам, на тон мужчин,
На толки про роман туманный,
На вензель, двум сестрицам данный,
На ложь журналов, на войну,
На снег и на свою жену.

XXVI

Тут был Проласов, заслуживший
Известность низостью души,
Во всех альбомах притупивший,
St.-Priest, твои карандаши;
В дверях другой диктатор бальный
Стоял картинкою журнальной,
Румян, как вербный херувим,
Затянут, нем и недвижим,
И путешественник залётный,
Перекрахмаленный нахал,
В гостях улыбку возбуждал
Своей осанкою заботной,
И молча обмененный взор
Ему был общий приговор.

XXVII

Но мой Онегин вечер целый
Татьяной занят был одной,
Не этой девочкой несмелой,
Влюбленной, бедной и простой,
Но равнодушною княгиней,
Но неприступною богиней
Роскошной, царственной Невы.
О люди! все похожи вы
На прародительницу Эву:
Что вам дано, то не влечет,
Вас непрестанно змий зовет
К себе, к таинственному древу;
Запретный плод вам подавай:
А без того вам рай не рай.

XXVIII

Как изменилася Татьяна!
Как твердо в роль свою вошла!
Как утеснительного сана
Приемы скоро приняла!
Кто б смел искать девчонки нежной
В сей величавой, в сей небрежной
Законодательнице зал?
И он ей сердце волновал!
Об нем она во мраке ночи,
Пока Морфей не прилетит,
Бывало, девственно грустит,
К луне подъемлет томны очи,
Мечтая с ним когда-нибудь
Свершить смиренный жизни путь!

XXIX

Любви все возрасты покорны;
Но юным, девственным сердцам
Ее порывы благотворны,
Как бури вешние полям:
В дожде страстей они свежеют,
И обновляются, и зреют —
И жизнь могущая дает
И пышный цвет и сладкий плод.
Но в возраст поздний и бесплодный,
На повороте наших лет,
Печален страсти мертвой след:
Так бури осени холодной
В болото обращают луг
И обнажают лес вокруг.

XXX

Сомненья нет: увы! Евгений
В Татьяну как дитя влюблен;
В тоске любовных помышлений
И день и ночь проводит он.
Ума не внемля строгим пеням,
К ее крыльцу, стеклянным сеням
Он подъезжает каждый день;
За ней он гонится как тень;
Он счастлив, если ей накинет
Боа пушистый на плечо,
Или коснется горячо
Ее руки, или раздвинет
Пред нею пестрый полк ливрей,
Или платок подымет ей.

XXXI

Она его не замечает,
Как он ни бейся, хоть умри.
Свободно дома принимает,
В гостях с ним молвит слова три,
Порой одним поклоном встретит,
Порою вовсе не заметит:
Кокетства в ней ни капли нет —
Его не терпит высший свет.
Бледнеть Онегин начинает:
Ей иль не видно, иль не жаль;
Онегин сохнет — и едва ль
Уж не чахоткою страдает.
Все шлют Онегина к врачам,
Те хором шлют его к водам.

XXXII

А он не едет; он заране
Писать ко прадедам готов
О скорой встрече; а Татьяне
И дела нет (их пол таков);
А он упрям, отстать не хочет,
Еще надеется, хлопочет;
Смелей здорового, больной,
Княгине слабою рукой
Он пишет страстное посланье.
Хоть толку мало вообще
Он в письмах видел не вотще;
Но, знать, сердечное страданье
Уже пришло ему невмочь.
Вот вам письмо его точь-в-точь.

Письмо
Онегина к Татьяне
Предвижу все: вас оскорбит
Печальной тайны объясненье.
Какое горькое презренье
Ваш гордый взгляд изобразит!
Чего хочу? с какою целью
Открою душу вам свою?
Какому злобному веселью,
Быть может, повод подаю!

Случайно вас когда-то встретя,
В вас искру нежности заметя,
Я ей поверить не посмел:
Привычке милой не дал ходу;
Свою постылую свободу
Я потерять не захотел.
Еще одно нас разлучило…
Несчастной жертвой Ленский пал…
Ото всего, что сердцу мило,
Тогда я сердце оторвал;
Чужой для всех, ничем не связан,
Я думал: вольность и покой
Замена счастью. Боже мой!
Как я ошибся, как наказан.

Нет, поминутно видеть вас,
Повсюду следовать за вами,
Улыбку уст, движенье глаз
Ловить влюбленными глазами,
Внимать вам долго, понимать
Душой все ваше совершенство,
Пред вами в муках замирать,
Бледнеть и гаснуть… вот блаженство!

И я лишен того: для вас
Тащусь повсюду наудачу;
Мне дорог день, мне дорог час:
А я в напрасной скуке трачу
Судьбой отсчитанные дни.
И так уж тягостны они.
Я знаю: век уж мой измерен;
Но чтоб продлилась жизнь моя,
Я утром должен быть уверен,
Что с вами днем увижусь я…

Боюсь: в мольбе моей смиренной
Увидит ваш суровый взор
Затеи хитрости презренной —
И слышу гневный ваш укор.
Когда б вы знали, как ужасно
Томиться жаждою любви,
Пылать — и разумом всечасно
Смирять волнение в крови;
Желать обнять у вас колени
И, зарыдав, у ваших ног
Излить мольбы, признанья, пени,
Все, все, что выразить бы мог,
А между тем притворным хладом
Вооружать и речь и взор,
Вести спокойный разговор,
Глядеть на вас веселым взглядом!..

Но так и быть: я сам себе
Противиться не в силах боле;
Все решено: я в вашей воле
И предаюсь моей судьбе.

XXXIII

Ответа нет. Он вновь посланье:
Второму, третьему письму
Ответа нет. В одно собранье
Он едет; лишь вошел… ему
Она навстречу. Как сурова!
Его не видят, с ним ни слова;
У! как теперь окружена
Крещенским холодом она!
Как удержать негодованье
Уста упрямые хотят!
Вперил Онегин зоркий взгляд:
Где, где смятенье, состраданье?
Где пятна слез?.. Их нет, их нет!
На сем лице лишь гнева след…

XXXIV

Да, может быть, боязни тайной,
Чтоб муж иль свет не угадал
Проказы, слабости случайной…
Всего, что мой Онегин знал…
Надежды нет! Он уезжает,
Свое безумство проклинает —
И, в нем глубоко погружен,
От света вновь отрекся он.
И в молчаливом кабинете
Ему припомнилась пора,
Когда жестокая хандра
За ним гналася в шумном свете,
Поймала, за ворот взяла
И в темный угол заперла.

XXXV

Стал вновь читать он без разбора.
Прочел он Гиббона, Руссо,
Манзони, Гердера, Шамфора,
Madame de Stael, Биша, Тиссо,
Прочел скептического Беля,
Прочел творенья Фонтенеля,
Прочел из наших кой-кого,
Не отвергая ничего:
И альманахи, и журналы,
Где поученья нам твердят,
Где нынче так меня бранят,
А где такие мадригалы
Себе встречал я иногда:
Е sempre bene, господа.

XXXVI

И что ж? Глаза его читали,
Но мысли были далеко;
Мечты, желания, печали
Теснились в душу глубоко.
Он меж печатными строками
Читал духовными глазами
Другие строки. В них-то он
Был совершенно углублен.
То были тайные преданья
Сердечной, темной старины,
Ни с чем не связанные сны,
Угрозы, толки, предсказанья,
Иль длинной сказки вздор живой,
Иль письма девы молодой.

XXXVII

И постепенно в усыпленье
И чувств и дум впадает он,
А перед ним воображенье
Свой пестрый мечет фараон.
То видит он: на талом снеге,
Как будто спящий на ночлеге,
Недвижим юноша лежит,
И слышит голос: что ж? убит.
То видит он врагов забвенных,
Клеветников, и трусов злых,
И рой изменниц молодых,
И круг товарищей презренных,
То сельский дом — и у окна
Сидит она… и все она!..

XXXVIII

Он так привык теряться в этом,
Что чуть с ума не своротил
Или не сделался поэтом.
Признаться: то-то б одолжил!
А точно: силой магнетизма
Стихов российских механизма
Едва в то время не постиг
Мой бестолковый ученик.
Как походил он на поэта,
Когда в углу сидел один,
И перед ним пылал камин,
И он мурлыкал: Benedetta
Иль Idol mio и ронял
В огонь то туфлю, то журнал.

XXXIX

Дни мчались; в воздухе нагретом
Уж разрешалася зима;
И он не сделался поэтом,
Не умер, не сошел с ума.
Весна живит его: впервые
Свои покои запертые,
Где зимовал он, как сурок,
Двойные окны, камелек
Он ясным утром оставляет,
Несется вдоль Невы в санях.
На синих, иссеченных льдах
Играет солнце; грязно тает
На улицах разрытый снег.
Куда по нем свой быстрый бег

XL

Стремит Онегин? Вы заране
Уж угадали; точно так:
Примчался к ней, к своей Татьяне
Мой неисправленный чудак.
Идет, на мертвеца похожий.
Нет ни одной души в прихожей.
Он в залу; дальше: никого.
Дверь отворил он. Что ж его
С такою силой поражает?
Княгиня перед ним, одна,
Сидит, не убрана, бледна,
Письмо какое-то читает
И тихо слезы льет рекой,
Опершись на руку щекой.

XLI

О, кто б немых ее страданий
В сей быстрый миг не прочитал!
Кто прежней Тани, бедной Тани
Теперь в княгине б не узнал!
В тоске безумных сожалений
К ее ногам упал Евгений;
Она вздрогнула и молчит;
И на Онегина глядит
Без удивления, без гнева…
Его больной, угасший взор,
Молящий вид, немой укор,
Ей внятно все. Простая дева,
С мечтами, сердцем прежних дней,
Теперь опять воскресла в ней.

XLII

Она его не подымает
И, не сводя с него очей,
От жадных уст не отымает
Бесчувственной руки своей…
О чем теперь ее мечтанье?
Проходит долгое молчанье,
И тихо наконец она:
«Довольно; встаньте. Я должна
Вам объясниться откровенно.
Онегин, помните ль тот час,
Когда в саду, в аллее нас
Судьба свела, и так смиренно
Урок ваш выслушала я?
Сегодня очередь моя.

XLIII

Онегин, я тогда моложе,
Я лучше, кажется, была,
И я любила вас; и что же?
Что в сердце вашем я нашла?
Какой ответ? одну суровость.
Не правда ль? Вам была не новость
Смиренной девочки любовь?
И нынче — боже! — стынет кровь,
Как только вспомню взгляд холодный
И эту проповедь… Но вас
Я не виню: в тот страшный час
Вы поступили благородно,
Вы были правы предо мной:
Я благодарна всей душой…

XLIV

Тогда — не правда ли? — в пустыне,
Вдали от суетной молвы,
Я вам не нравилась… Что ж ныне
Меня преследуете вы?
Зачем у вас я на примете?
Не потому ль, что в высшем свете
Теперь являться я должна;
Что я богата и знатна,
Что муж в сраженьях изувечен,
Что нас за то ласкает двор?
Не потому ль, что мой позор
Теперь бы всеми был замечен,
И мог бы в обществе принесть
Вам соблазнительную честь?

XLV

Я плачу… если вашей Тани
Вы не забыли до сих пор,
То знайте: колкость вашей брани,
Холодный, строгий разговор,
Когда б в моей лишь было власти,
Я предпочла б обидной страсти
И этим письмам и слезам.
К моим младенческим мечтам
Тогда имели вы хоть жалость,
Хоть уважение к летам…
А нынче! — что к моим ногам
Вас привело? какая малость!
Как с вашим сердцем и умом
Быть чувства мелкого рабом?

XLVI

А мне, Онегин, пышность эта,
Постылой жизни мишура,
Мои успехи в вихре света,
Мой модный дом и вечера,
Что в них? Сейчас отдать я рада
Всю эту ветошь маскарада,
Весь этот блеск, и шум, и чад
За полку книг, за дикий сад,
За наше бедное жилище,
За те места, где в первый раз,
Онегин, видела я вас,
Да за смиренное кладбище,
Где нынче крест и тень ветвей
Над бедной нянею моей…

XLVII

А счастье было так возможно,
Так близко!.. Но судьба моя
Уж решена. Неосторожно,
Быть может, поступила я:
Меня с слезами заклинаний
Молила мать; для бедной Тани
Все были жребии равны…
Я вышла замуж. Вы должны,
Я вас прошу, меня оставить;
Я знаю: в вашем сердце есть
И гордость и прямая честь.
Я вас люблю (к чему лукавить?),
Но я другому отдана;
Я буду век ему верна».

XLVIII

Она ушла. Стоит Евгений,
Как будто громом поражен.
В какую бурю ощущений
Теперь он сердцем погружен!
Но шпор незапный звон раздался,
И муж Татьянин показался,
И здесь героя моего,
В минуту, злую для него,
Читатель, мы теперь оставим,
Надолго… навсегда. За ним
Довольно мы путем одним
Бродили по свету. Поздравим
Друг друга с берегом. Ура!
Давно б (не правда ли?) пора!

XLIX

Кто б ни был ты, о мой читатель,
Друг, недруг, я хочу с тобой
Расстаться нынче как приятель.
Прости. Чего бы ты за мной
Здесь ни искал в строфах небрежных,
Воспоминаний ли мятежных,
Отдохновенья ль от трудов,
Живых картин, иль острых слов,
Иль грамматических ошибок,
Дай бог, чтоб в этой книжке ты
Для развлеченья, для мечты,
Для сердца, для журнальных сшибок
Хотя крупицу мог найти.
За сим расстанемся, прости!

L

Прости ж и ты, мой спутник странный,
И ты, мой верный идеал,
И ты, живой и постоянный,
Хоть малый труд. Я с вами знал
Все, что завидно для поэта:
Забвенье жизни в бурях света,
Беседу сладкую друзей.
Промчалось много, много дней
С тех пор, как юная Татьяна
И с ней Онегин в смутном сне
Явилися впервые мне —
И даль свободного романа
Я сквозь магический кристалл
Еще не ясно различал.

LI

Но те, которым в дружной встрече
Я строфы первые читал…
Иных уж нет, а те далече,
Как Сади некогда сказал.
Без них Онегин дорисован.
А та, с которой образован
Татьяны милый идеал…
О много, много рок отъял!
Блажен, кто праздник жизни рано
Оставил, не допив до дна
Бокала полного вина,
Кто не дочел ее романа
И вдруг умел расстаться с ним,
Как я с Онегиным моим.

Конец
Alexander Pushkin
0

Tags: Alexander Pushkin / Alexander Pushkin - Eugene Onegin
Add comment

Add comment

reload, if the code cannot be seen