Alexander Pushkin - Eugene Onegin (Chapter 5) / Евгений Онегин (5 часть)


in English

That year the season was belated
and autumn lingered, long and slow;
expecting winter, nature waited --
only in January the snow,
night of the second, started flaking.
Next day Tatyana, early waking,
saw through the window, morning-bright,
roofs, flowerbeds, fences, all in white,
panes patterned by the finest printer,
with trees decked in their silvery kit,
and jolly magpies on the flit,
and hills that delicately winter
had with its brilliant mantle crowned --
and glittering whiteness all around.

II

Winter!... The countryman, enchanted,
breaks a new passage with his sleigh;
his nag has smelt the snow, and planted
a shambling hoof along the way;
a saucy kibitka is slicing
its furrow through the powdery icing;
the driver sits and cuts a dash
in sheepskin coat with scarlet sash.
Here comes the yard-boy, who has chosen
his pup to grace the sledge, while he
becomes a horse for all to see;
the rogue has got a finger frozen:
it hurts, he laughs, and all in vain
his mother taps the window-pane.

III

But you perhaps find no attraction
in any picture of this kind:
for nature's unadorned reaction
has something low and unrefined.
Fired by the god of inspiration,
another bard1 in exaltation
has painted for us the first snow
with each nuance of wintry glow:
he'll charm you with his fine invention,
he'll take you prisoner, you'll admire
secret sledge-rides in verse of fire;
but I've not got the least intention
just now of wrestling with his shade,
nor his,2 who sings of Finland's maid.

IV

Tanya (profoundly Russian being,
herself not knowing how or why)
in Russian winters thrilled at seeing
the cold perfection of the sky,
hoar-frost and sun in freezing weather,
sledges, and tardy dawns together
with the pink glow the snows assume
and festal evenings in the gloom.
The Larins kept the old tradition:
maid-servants from the whole estate
would on those evenings guess the fate
of the two girls; their premonition
pointed each year, for time to come,
at soldier-husbands, and the drum.

V

Tatyana shared with full conviction
the simple faith of olden days
in dreams and cards and their prediction,
and portents of the lunar phase.
Omens dismayed her with their presage;
each object held a secret message
for her instruction, and her breast
was by forebodings much oppressed.
The tomcat, mannered and affected,
that sat above the stove and purred
and washed its face, to her brought word
that visitors must be expected.
If suddenly aloft she spied
the new moon, horned, on her left side,

VI

her face would pale, she'd start to quiver.
In the dark sky, a shooting star
that fell, and then began to shiver,
would fill Tatyana from afar
with perturbation and with worry;
and while the star still flew, she'd hurry
to whisper it her inmost prayer.
And if she happened anywhere
to meet a black monk, or if crossing
her path a hare in headlong flight
ran through the fields, sheer panic fright
would leave her dithering and tossing.
By dire presentiment awestruck,
already she'd assume ill-luck.

VII

Yet -- fear itself she found presented
a hidden beauty in the end:
our disposition being invented
by nature, contradiction's friend.
Christmas came on. What joy, what gladness!
Yes, youth divines, in giddy madness,
youth which has nothing to regret,
before which life's horizon yet
lies bright, and vast beyond perceiving;
spectacled age divines as well,
although it's nearly heard the knell,
and all is lost beyond retrieving;
no matter: hope, in child's disguise,
is there to lisp its pack of lies.

VIII

Tatyana looks with pulses racing
at sunken wax inside a bowl:
beyond a doubt, its wondrous tracing
foretells for her some wondrous role;
from dish of water, rings are shifted
in due succession; hers is lifted
and at the very self-same time
the girls sing out the ancient rhyme:
``The peasants there have wealth abounding,
they heap up silver with a spade;
and those we sing for will be paid
in goods and fame!'' But the sad-sounding
ditty portends a loss; more dear
is ``Kit''3 to every maiden's ear.

IX

The sky is clear, the earth is frozen;
the heavenly lights in glorious quire
tread the calm, settled path they've chosen...
Tatyana in low-cut attire
goes out into the courtyard spaces
and trains a mirror till it faces
the moon; but in the darkened glass
the only face to shake and pass
is sad old moon's... Hark! snow is creaking...
a passer-by; and on tiptoe
she flies as fast as she can go;
and ``what's your name?'' she asks him, speaking
in a melodious, flute-like tone.
He looks, and answers: ``Agafon.''4

X

Prepared for prophecy and fable,
she did what nurse advised she do
and in the bath-house had a table
that night, in secret, set for two;
then sudden fear attacked Tatyana...
I too -- when I recall Svetlana5
I'm terrified -- so let it be...
Tatyana's rites are not for me.
She's dropped her sash's silken billow;
Tanya's undressed, and lies in bed.
Lel6 floats about above her head;
and underneath her downy pillow
a young girl's looking-glass is kept.
Now all was still. Tatyana slept.

XI

She dreamt of portents. In her dreaming
she walked across a snowy plain
through gloom and mist; and there came streaming
a furious, boiling, heaving main
across the drift-encumbered acres,
a raging torrent, capped with breakers,
a flood on which no frosty band
had been imposed by winter's hand;
two poles that ice had glued like plaster
were placed across the gulf to make
a flimsy bridge whose every quake
spelt hazard, ruin and disaster;
she stopped at the loud torrent's bound,
perplexed... and rooted to the ground.

XII

As if before some mournful parting
Tatyana groaned above the tide;
she saw no friendly figure starting
to help her from the other side;
but suddenly a snowdrift rumbled,
and what came out? a hairy, tumbled,
enormous bear; Tatyana yelled,
the bear let out a roar, and held
a sharp-nailed paw towards her; bracing
her nerves, she leant on it her weight,
and with a halting, trembling gait
above the water started tracing
her way; she passed, then as she walked
the bear -- what next? -- behind her stalked.

XIII

A backward look is fraught with danger;
she speeds her footsteps to a race,
but from her shaggy-liveried ranger
she can't escape at any pace --
the odious bear still grunts and lumbers.
Ahead of them a pinewood slumbers
in the full beauty of its frown;
the branches all are weighted down
with tufts of snow; and through the lifted
summits of aspen, birch and lime,
the nightly luminaries climb.
No path to see: the snow has drifted
across each bush, across each steep,
and all the world is buried deep.

XIV

She's in the wood, the bear still trails her.
There's powdery snow up to her knees;
now a protruding branch assails her
and clasps her neck; and now she sees
her golden earrings off and whipping;
and now the crunchy snow is stripping
her darling foot of its wet shoe,
her handkerchief has fallen too;
no time to pick it up -- she's dying
with fright, she hears the approaching bear;
her fingers shake, she doesn't dare
to lift her skirt up; still she's flying,
and he pursuing, till at length
she flies no more, she's lost her strength.

XV

She's fallen in the snow -- alertly
the bear has raised her in his paws;
and she, submissively, inertly --
no move she makes, no breath she draws;
he whirls her through the wood... a hovel
shows up through trees, all of a grovel
in darkest forest depths and drowned
by dreary snowdrifts piled around;
there's a small window shining in it,
and from within come noise and cheer;
the bear explains: ``my cousin's here --
come in and warm yourself a minute!''
he carries her inside the door
and sets her gently on the floor.

XVI

Tatyana looks, her faintness passes:
bear's gone; a hallway, no mistake;
behind the door the clash of glasses
and shouts suggest a crowded wake;
so, seeing there no rhyme or reason,
no meaning in or out of season,
she peers discreetly through a chink
and sees... whatever do you think?
a group of monsters round a table,
a dog with horns, a goatee'd witch,
a rooster head, and on the twitch
a skeleton jerked by a cable,
a dwarf with tail, and a half-strain,
a hybrid cross of cat and crane.

XVII

But ever stranger and more fearful:
a crayfish rides on spider-back;
on goose's neck, a skull looks cheerful
and swaggers in a red calpack;
with bended knees a windmill dances,
its sails go flap-flap as it prances;
song, laughter, whistle, bark and champ,
and human words, and horse's stamp!
But how she jumped, when in this hovel
among the guests she recognized
the man she feared and idolized --
who else? -- the hero of our novel!
Onegin sits at table too,
he eyes the door, looks slyly through.

XVIII

He nods -- they start to fuss and truckle;
he drinks -- all shout and take a swill;
he laughs -- they all begin to chuckle;
he scowls -- and the whole gang are still;
he's host, that's obvious. Thus enlightened
Tanya's no longer quite so frightened
and, curious now about the lot,
opens the door a tiny slot...
but then a sudden breeze surprises,
puts out the lamps; the whole brigade
of house-familiars stands dismayed...
with eyes aflame Onegin rises
from table, clattering on the floor;
all stand. He walks towards the door.

XIX

Now she's alarmed; in desperate worry
Tatyana struggles to run out --
she can't; and in her panic hurry
she flails around, she tries to shout --
she can't; Evgeny's pushed the portal,
and to the vision of those mortal
monsters the maiden stood revealed.
Wildly the fearful laughter pealed;
the eyes of all, the hooves, the snozzles,
the bleeding tongues, the tufted tails,
the tusks, the corpse's finger-nails,
the horns, and the moustachio'd nozzles --
all point at her, and all combine
to bellow out: ``she's mine, she's mine.''

XX

``She's mine!'' Evgeny's voice of thunder
clears in a flash the freezing room;
the whole thieves' kitchen flies asunder,
the girl remains there in the gloom
alone with him; Onegin takes her
into a corner, gently makes her
sit on a flimsy bench, and lays
his head upon her shoulder... blaze
of sudden brightness... it's too curious...
Olga's appeared upon the scene,
and Lensky follows her... Eugene,
eyes rolling, arms uplifted, furious,
damns the intruders; Tanya lies
and almost swoons, and almost dies.

XXI

Louder and louder sounds the wrangle:
Eugene has caught up, quick as quick,
a carving-knife -- and in the tangle
Lensky's thrown down. The murk is thick
and growing thicker; then, heart-shaking,
a scream rings out... the cabin's quaking...
Tanya comes to in utter fright...
she looks, the room is getting light --
outside, the scarlet rays of dawning
play on the window's frosted lace;
in through the door, at swallow's pace,
pinker than glow of Northern morning,
flits Olga: ``now, tell me straight out,
who was it that you dreamt about?''

XXII

Deaf to her sister's intervention,
Tatyana simply lay in bed,
devoured a book with rapt attention,
and kept quite silent while she read.
The book displayed, not so you'd know it,
no magic fancies of the poet,
no brilliant truth, no vivid scene;
and yet by Vergil or Racine
by Scott, by Seneca, or Byron,
even by Ladies' Fashion Post,
no one was ever so engrossed:
Martin Zadeka was the siren,
dean of Chaldea's learned team,
arch-commentator of the dream.

XXIII

This work of the profoundest learning
was brought there by a huckster who
one day came down that lonely turning,
and to Tanya, when he was through,
swapped it for odd tomes of Malvina,
but just to make the bargain keener,
he charged three roubles and a half,
and took two Petriads in calf,
a grammar, a digest of fable,
and volume three of Marmontel.
Since then Martin Zadeka's spell
bewitches Tanya... he is able
to comfort her in all her woes,
and every night shares her repose.

XXIV

Tatyana's haunted by her vision,
plagued by her ghastly dream, and tries
to puzzle out with some precision
just what the nightmare signifies.
Searching the table exegetic
she finds, in order alphabetic:
bear, blackness, blizzard, bridge and crow,
fir, forest, hedgehog, raven, snow
etcetera. But her trepidation
Martin Zadeka fails to mend;
the horrid nightmare must portend
a hideous deal of tribulation.
For several days she peaked and pined
in deep anxiety of mind.

XXV

But now Aurora's crimson fingers
from daybreak valleys lift the sun;
the morning light no longer lingers,
the festal name day has begun.
Since dawn, whole families have been driving
towards the Larins' and arriving
in sledded coaches and coupes,
in britzkas, kibitkas and sleighs.
The hall is full of noise and hustle,
in the salon new faces meet,
and kisses smack as young girls greet;
there's yap of pugs, and laughs, and bustle;
the threshold's thronged, wet-nurses call,
guests bow, feet scrape, and children squall.

XXVI

Here with his wife, that bulging charmer,
fat Pustyakov has driven in;
Gvozdin, exemplary farmer,
whose serfs are miserably thin;
and the Skotinins, grizzled sages,
with broods of children of all ages,
from thirty down to two; and stop,
here's Petushkov, the local fop;
and look, my cousin's come, Buyanov,
in a peaked cap, all dust and fluff, --
you'll recognize him soon enough, --
and counsellor (retired) Flyanov,
that rogue, backbiter, pantaloon,
bribe-taker, glutton and buffoon.

XXVII

Here, in his red peruke and glasses,
late of Tambov, Monsieur Triquet
has come with Kharlikov; he passes
for witty; in his Gallic way
inside a pocket Triquet nurses,
addressed to Tanya, certain verses
set to well-known children's glee:
``reveillez-vous, belle endormie.''
He found them in some old collection,
printed among outmoded airs;
Triquet, ingenious poet, dares
to undertake their resurrection,
and for belle Nina, as it read,
he's put belle Tatiana instead.

XXVIII

And from the nearby Army station
the Major's here: he's all the rage
with our Mamas, and a sensation
with demoiselles of riper age;
his news has set the party humming!
the regimental band is coming,
sent at the Colonel's own behest.
A ball: the joy of every guest!
Young ladies jump for future blisses...
But dinner's served, so two by two
and arm in arm they all go through;
round Tanya congregate the misses,
the men confront them, face to face:
they sit, they cross themselves for grace.

XXIX

They buzz -- but then all talk's suspended --
jaws masticate as minutes pass:
the crash of plates and knives is blended
with the resounding chime of glass.
And now there's gradually beginning
among the guests a general dinning:
none listens when the others speak,
all shout and argue, laugh and squeak.
Then doors are opened, Lensky enters,
Onegin too. ``Good Lord, at last!''
the hostess cries and, moving fast,
the guests squeeze closer to the centres;
they shove each plate, and every chair,
and shout, and make room for the pair.

XXX

Just facing Tanya's where they're sitting;
and paler than the moon at dawn,
she lowers darkened eyes, unwitting,
and trembles like a hunted fawn.
From violent passions fast pulsating
she's nearly swooned, she's suffocating;
the friends' salute she never hears
and from her eyes the eager tears
are almost bursting; she's quite ready,
poor girl, to drop into a faint,
but will, and reason's strong constraint,
prevailed, and with composure steady
she sat there; through her teeth a word
came out so soft, it scarce was heard.

XXXI

The nervous-tragical reaction,
girls' tears, their swooning, for Eugene
had long proved tedious to distraction:
he knew too well that sort of scene.
Now, faced with this enormous revel,
he'd got annoyed, the tricky devil.
He saw the sad girl's trembling state,
looked down in an access of hate,
pouted, and swore in furious passion
to wreak, by stirring Lensky's ire,
the best revenge one could desire.
Already, in exultant fashion,
he watched the guests and, as he dined,
caricatured them in his mind.

XXXII

Tanya's distress had risked detection
not only by Evgeny's eye;
but looks and talk took the direction,
that moment, of a luscious pie
(alas, too salted); now they're bringing
bottles to which some pitch is clinging:
Tsimlyansky wine, between the meat
and the blancmanger, then a fleet
of goblets, tall and slender pretties;
how they remind me of your stem,
Zizi, my crystal and my gem,
you object of my guileless ditties!
with draughts from love's enticing flask,
you made me drunk as one could ask!

XXXIII

Freed from its dripping cork, the bottle
explodes; wine fizzes up... but stay:
solemn, too long compelled to throttle
his itching verse, Monsieur Triquet
is on his feet -- in utter stillness
the party waits. Seized with an illness
of swooning, Tanya nearly dies;
and, scroll in hand, before her eyes
Triquet sings, out of tune. Loud clapping
and cheers salute him. Tanya must
thank him by curtseying to the dust;
great bard despite his modest trapping,
he's first to toast her in the bowl,
then he presents her with the scroll.

XXXIV

Compliment and congratulation;
Tanya thanks each one with a phrase.
When Eugene's turn for salutation
arrives, the girl's exhausted gaze,
her discomposure, her confusion,
expose his soul to an intrusion
of pity: in his silent bow,
and in his look there shows somehow
a wondrous tenderness. And whether
it was that he'd been truly stirred,
or half-unwittingly preferred
a joking flirt, or both together,
there was a softness in his glance:
it brought back Tanya from her trance.

XXXV

Chairs are pushed outward, loudly rumbling,
and all into the salon squeeze,
as from their luscious hive go tumbling
fieldward, in noisy swarm, the bees.
The banquet's given no cause for sneezing,
neighbours in high content are wheezing;
ladies at the fireside confer,
in corners whispering girls concur;
now, by green tablecloths awaited,
the eager players are enrolled --
Boston and ombre for the old,
and whist, that's now so keenly feted --
pursuits of a monotonous breed
begot by boredom out of greed.

XXXVI

By now whist's heroes have completed
eight rubbers; and by now eight times
they've moved around and been reseated;
and tea's brought in. Instead of chimes
I like to tell the time by dinner
and tea and supper; there's an inner
clock in the country rings the hour;
no fuss; our belly has the power
of any Breguet: and in passing
I'll just remark, my verses talk
as much of banquets and the cork
and eatables beyond all classing
as yours did, Homer, godlike lord,
whom thirty centuries have adored!

< XXXVII7

At feasts, though, full of pert aggression,
I put your genius to the test,
I make magnanimous confession,
in other things you come off best:
your heroes, raging and ferocious,
your battles, lawless and atrocious,
your Zeus, your Cypris, your whole band
have clearly got the upper hand
of Eugene, cold as all creation,
of plains where boredom reigns complete,
or of Istomina, my sweet,
and all our modish education;
but your vile Helen's not my star --
no, Tanya's more endearing far.

XXXVIII

No one will think that worth gainsaying,
though Menelaus, in Helen's name,
may spend a century in flaying
the hapless Phrygians all the same,
and although Troy's greybeards, collected
around Priam the much-respected,
may chorus, when she comes in sight,
that Menelaus was quite right --
and Paris too. But hear my pleading:
as battles go, I've not begun;
don't judge the race before it's run --
be good enough to go on reading:
there'll be a fight. For that I give
my word; no welshing, as I live. >

XXXIX

Here's tea: the girls have just, as bidden,
taken the saucers in their grip,
when, from behind the doorway, hidden
bassoons and flutes begin to trip.
Elated by the music's blaring,
Petushkov, local Paris, tearing,
his tea with rum quite left behind,
approaches Olga; Lensky's signed
Tatyana on; Miss Kharlikova,
that nubile maid of riper age,
is seized by Tambov's poet-sage;
Buyanov whirls off Pustyakova;
they all have swarmed into the hall,
and in full brilliance shines the ball.

XL

Right at the outset of my story
(if you'll turn back to chapter one)
I meant to paint, with Alban's8 glory,
a ball in Petersburg; but fun
and charming reverie's vain deflection
absorbed me in the recollection
of certain ladies' tiny feet.
Enough I've wandered in the suite
of your slim prints! though this be treason
to my young days, it's time I turned
to wiser words and deeds, and learned
to demonstrate some signs of reason:
let no more such digressions lurk
in this fifth chapter of my work.

XLI

And now, monotonously dashing
like mindless youth, the waltz goes by
with spinning noise and senseless flashing
as pair by pair the dancers fly.
Revenge's hour is near, and after
Evgeny, full of inward laughter,
has gone to Olga, swept the girl
past all the assembly in a whirl,
he takes her to a chair, beginning
to talk of this and that, but then
after two minutes, off again,
they're on the dance-floor, waltzing, spinning.
All are dumbfounded. Lensky shies
away from trusting his own eyes.

XLII

Now the mazurka sounds. Its thunder
used in times past to ring a peal
that huge ballrooms vibrated under,
while floors would split from crash of heel,
and frames would shudder, windows tremble;
now things are changed, now we resemble
ladies who glide on waxed parquet.
Yet the mazurka keeps today
in country towns and suchlike places
its pristine charm: heeltaps, and leaps,
and whiskers -- all of this it keeps
as fresh as ever, for its graces
are here untouched by fashion's reign,
our modern Russia's plague and bane.

XLIII7

... ...

< Petushkov's nails and spurs are sounding
(that half-pay archivist); and bounding
Buyanov's heels have split the wood
and wrecked the flooring-boards for good;
there's crashing, rumbling, pounding, trotting,
the deeper in the wood, the more
the logs; the wild ones have the floor;
they're plunging, whirling, all but squatting.
Ah, gently, gently, easy goes --
your heels will squash the ladies' toes! >

XLIV

Buyanov, my vivacious cousin,
leads Olga and Tatyana on
to Eugene; nineteen to the dozen,
Eugene takes Olga, and is gone;
he steers her, nonchalantly gliding,
he stoops and, tenderly confiding,
whispers some ballad of the hour,
squeezes her hand -- and brings to flower
on her smug face a flush of pleasure.
Lensky has watched: his rage has blazed,
he's lost his self-command, and crazed
with jealousy beyond all measure
insists, when the mazurka ends,
on the cotillion, as amends.

XLV

He asks. She can't accept. Why ever?
No, she's already pledged her word
to Evgeny. Oh, God, she'd never...
How could she? why, he'd never heard...
scarce out of bibs, already fickle,
fresh from the cot, an infant pickle,
already studying to intrigue,
already high in treason's league!
He finds the shock beyond all bearing:
so, cursing women's devious course,
he leaves the house, calls for his horse
and gallops. Pistols made for pairing
and just a double charge of shot
will in a flash decide his lot.

Notes to Chapter Five

1 ``See First Snow, a poem by Prince Vyazemsky.'' Pushkin's note. For
Prince P. Vyazemsky (1791--1878), poet, critic and close friend of Pushkin,
see also Chapter Seven, XLIX.
2 ``See the descriptions of the Finnish winter in Baratynsky's Eda''.
Pushkin's note.
3 ``"Tomcat calls Kit" -- a song foretelling marriage.'' Pushkin's
note.
4 This Russianized version of the Greek Agatho is ``elephantine and
rustic to the Russian ear''. Nabokov. See note 3 to Chapter Two.
5 Girl in Zhukovsky's poem who practises divination, with frightening
results. See note 2 to Chapter Three.
6 Slavonic god of love.
7 Stanzas XXXVII, XXXVIII and XLIII were discarded by Pushkin.
8 Francesco Albani, Italian painter (1578-1660).

in Russian

В тот год осенняя погода
Стояла долго на дворе,
Зимы ждала, ждала природа.
Снег выпал только в январе
На третье в ночь. Проснувшись рано,
В окно увидела Татьяна
Поутру побелевший двор,
Куртины, кровли и забор,
На стеклах легкие узоры,
Деревья в зимнем серебре,
Сорок веселых на дворе
И мягко устланные горы
Зимы блистательным ковром.
Все ярко, все бело кругом.

II

Зима!.. Крестьянин, торжествуя,
На дровнях обновляет путь;
Его лошадка, снег почуя,
Плетется рысью как-нибудь;
Бразды пушистые взрывая,
Летит кибитка удалая;
Ямщик сидит на облучке
В тулупе, в красном кушаке.
Вот бегает дворовый мальчик,
В салазки жучку посадив,
Себя в коня преобразив;
Шалун уж заморозил пальчик:
Ему и больно и смешно,
А мать грозит ему в окно…

III

Но, может быть, такого рода
Картины вас не привлекут:
Все это низкая природа;
Изящного не много тут.
Согретый вдохновенья богом,
Другой поэт роскошным слогом
Живописал нам первый снег
И все оттенки зимних нег;
Он вас пленит, я в том уверен,
Рисуя в пламенных стихах
Прогулки тайные в санях;
Но я бороться не намерен
Ни с ним покамест, ни с тобой,
Певец финляндки молодой!

IV

Татьяна (русская душою,
Сама не зная почему)
С ее холодною красою
Любила русскую зиму,
На солнце иний в день морозный,
И сани, и зарею поздной
Сиянье розовых снегов,
И мглу крещенских вечеров.
По старине торжествовали
В их доме эти вечера:
Служанки со всего двора
Про барышень своих гадали
И им сулили каждый год
Мужьев военных и поход.

V

Татьяна верила преданьям
Простонародной старины,
И снам, и карточным гаданьям,
И предсказаниям луны.
Ее тревожили приметы;
Таинственно ей все предметы
Провозглашали что-нибудь,
Предчувствия теснили грудь.
Жеманный кот, на печке сидя,
Мурлыча, лапкой рыльце мыл:
То несомненный знак ей был,
Что едут гости. Вдруг увидя
Младой двурогий лик луны
На небе с левой стороны,

VI

Она дрожала и бледнела.
Когда ж падучая звезда
По небу темному летела
И рассыпалася, — тогда
В смятенье Таня торопилась,
Пока звезда еще катилась,
Желанье сердца ей шепнуть.
Когда случалось где-нибудь
Ей встретить черного монаха
Иль быстрый заяц меж полей
Перебегал дорогу ей,
Не зная, что начать со страха,
Предчувствий горестных полна,
Ждала несчастья уж она.

VII

Что ж? Тайну прелесть находила
И в самом ужасе она:
Так нас природа сотворила,
К противуречию склонна.
Настали святки. То-то радость!
Гадает ветреная младость,
Которой ничего не жаль,
Перед которой жизни даль
Лежит светла, необозрима;
Гадает старость сквозь очки
У гробовой своей доски,
Все потеряв невозвратимо;
И все равно: надежда им
Лжет детским лепетом своим.

VIII

Татьяна любопытным взором
На воск потопленный глядит:
Он чудно вылитым узором
Ей что-то чудное гласит;
Из блюда, полного водою,
Выходят кольцы чередою;
И вынулось колечко ей
Под песенку старинных дней:
«Там мужички-то всё богаты,
Гребут лопатой серебро;
Кому поем, тому добро
И слава!» Но сулит утраты
Сей песни жалостный напев;
Милей кошурка сердцу дев 29.

IX

Морозна ночь, все небо ясно;
Светил небесных дивный хор
Течет так тихо, так согласно…
Татьяна на широкой двор
В открытом платьице выходит,
На месяц зеркало наводит;
Но в темном зеркале одна
Дрожит печальная луна…
Чу… снег хрустит… прохожий; дева
К нему на цыпочках летит,
И голосок ее звучит
Нежней свирельного напева:
Как ваше имя? 30 Смотрит он
И отвечает: Агафон.

X

Татьяна, по совету няни
Сбираясь ночью ворожить,
Тихонько приказала в бане
На два прибора стол накрыть;
Но стало страшно вдруг Татьяне…
И я — при мысли о Светлане
Мне стало страшно — так и быть…
С Татьяной нам не ворожить.
Татьяна поясок шелковый
Сняла, разделась и в постель
Легла. Над нею вьется Лель,
А под подушкою пуховой
Девичье зеркало лежит.
Утихло все. Татьяна спит.

XI

И снится чудный сон Татьяне.
Ей снится, будто бы она
Идет по снеговой поляне,
Печальной мглой окружена;
В сугробах снежных перед нею
Шумит, клубит волной своею
Кипучий, темный и седой
Поток, не скованный зимой;
Две жердочки, склеены льдиной,
Дрожащий, гибельный мосток,
Положены через поток;
И пред шумящею пучиной,
Недоумения полна,
Остановилася она.

XII

Как на досадную разлуку,
Татьяна ропщет на ручей;
Не видит никого, кто руку
С той стороны подал бы ей;
Но вдруг сугроб зашевелился.
И кто ж из-под него явился?
Большой, взъерошенный медведь;
Татьяна ах! а он реветь,
И лапу с острыми когтями
Ей протянул; она скрепясь
Дрожащей ручкой оперлась
И боязливыми шагами
Перебралась через ручей;
Пошла — и что ж? медведь за ней!

XIII

Она, взглянуть назад не смея,
Поспешный ускоряет шаг;
Но от косматого лакея
Не может убежать никак;
Кряхтя, валит медведь несносный;
Пред ними лес; недвижны сосны
В своей нахмуренной красе;
Отягчены их ветви все
Клоками снега; сквозь вершины
Осин, берез и лип нагих
Сияет луч светил ночных;
Дороги нет; кусты, стремнины
Метелью все занесены,
Глубоко в снег погружены.

XIV

Татьяна в лес; медведь за нею;
Снег рыхлый по колено ей;
То длинный сук ее за шею
Зацепит вдруг, то из ушей
Златые серьги вырвет силой;
То в хрупком снеге с ножки милой
Увязнет мокрый башмачок;
То выронит она платок;
Поднять ей некогда; боится,
Медведя слышит за собой,
И даже трепетной рукой
Одежды край поднять стыдится;
Она бежит, он все вослед,
И сил уже бежать ей нет.

XV

Упала в снег; медведь проворно
Ее хватает и несет;
Она бесчувственно-покорна,
Не шевельнется, не дохнет;
Он мчит ее лесной дорогой;
Вдруг меж дерев шалаш убогой;
Кругом все глушь; отвсюду он
Пустынным снегом занесен,
И ярко светится окошко,
И в шалаше и крик и шум;
Медведь промолвил: «Здесь мой кум:
Погрейся у него немножко!»
И в сени прямо он идет
И на порог ее кладет.

XVI

Опомнилась, глядит Татьяна:
Медведя нет; она в сенях;
За дверью крик и звон стакана,
Как на больших похоронах;
Не видя тут ни капли толку,
Глядит она тихонько в щелку,
И что же видит?.. за столом
Сидят чудовища кругом:
Один в рогах с собачьей мордой,
Другой с петушьей головой,
Здесь ведьма с козьей бородой,
Тут остов чопорный и гордый,
Там карла с хвостиком, а вот
Полужуравль и полукот.

XVII

Еще страшней, еще чуднее:
Вот рак верхом на пауке,
Вот череп на гусиной шее
Вертится в красном колпаке,
Вот мельница вприсядку пляшет
И крыльями трещит и машет;
Лай, хохот, пенье, свист и хлоп,
Людская молвь и конской топ! 31
Но что подумала Татьяна,
Когда узнала меж гостей
Того, кто мил и страшен ей,
Героя нашего романа!
Онегин за столом сидит
И в дверь украдкою глядит.

XVIII

Он знак подаст — и все хлопочут;
Он пьет — все пьют и все кричат;
Он засмеется — все хохочут;
Нахмурит брови — все молчат;
Он там хозяин, это ясно:
И Тане уж не так ужасно,
И, любопытная, теперь
Немного растворила дверь…
Вдруг ветер дунул, загашая
Огонь светильников ночных;
Смутилась шайка домовых;
Онегин, взорами сверкая,
Из-за стола, гремя, встает;
Все встали: он к дверям идет.

XIX

И страшно ей; и торопливо
Татьяна силится бежать:
Нельзя никак; нетерпеливо
Метаясь, хочет закричать:
Не может; дверь толкнул Евгений:
И взорам адских привидений
Явилась дева; ярый смех
Раздался дико; очи всех,
Копыты, хоботы кривые,
Хвосты хохлатые, клыки,
Усы, кровавы языки,
Рога и пальцы костяные,
Всё указует на нее,
И все кричат: мое! мое!

XX

Мое! — сказал Евгений грозно,
И шайка вся сокрылась вдруг;
Осталася во тьме морозной
Младая дева с ним сам-друг;
Онегин тихо увлекает 32
Татьяну в угол и слагает
Ее на шаткую скамью
И клонит голову свою
К ней на плечо; вдруг Ольга входит,
За нею Ленский; свет блеснул;
Онегин руку замахнул,
И дико он очами бродит,
И незваных гостей бранит;
Татьяна чуть жива лежит.

XXI

Спор громче, громче; вдруг Евгений
Хватает длинный нож, и вмиг
Повержен Ленский; страшно тени
Сгустились; нестерпимый крик
Раздался… хижина шатнулась…
И Таня в ужасе проснулась…
Глядит, уж в комнате светло;
В окне сквозь мерзлое стекло
Зари багряный луч играет;
Дверь отворилась. Ольга к ней,
Авроры северной алей
И легче ласточки, влетает;
«Ну, говорит, скажи ж ты мне,
Кого ты видела во сне?»

XXII

Но та, сестры не замечая,
В постеле с книгою лежит,
За листом лист перебирая,
И ничего не говорит.
Хоть не являла книга эта
Ни сладких вымыслов поэта,
Ни мудрых истин, ни картин,
Но ни Виргилий, ни Расин,
Ни Скотт, ни Байрон, ни Сенека,
Ни даже Дамских Мод Журнал
Так никого не занимал:
То был, друзья, Мартын Задека 33,
Глава халдейских мудрецов,
Гадатель, толкователь снов.

XXIII

Сие глубокое творенье
Завез кочующий купец
Однажды к ним в уединенье
И для Татьяны наконец
Его с разрозненной «Мальвиной»
Он уступил за три с полтиной,
В придачу взяв еще за них
Собранье басен площадных,
Грамматику, две Петриады
Да Мармонтеля третий том.
Мартын Задека стал потом
Любимец Тани… Он отрады
Во всех печалях ей дарит
И безотлучно с нею спит.

XXIV

Ее тревожит сновиденье.
Не зная, как его понять,
Мечтанья страшного значенье
Татьяна хочет отыскать.
Татьяна в оглавленье кратком
Находит азбучным порядком
Слова: бор, буря, ведьма, ель,
Еж, мрак, мосток, медведь, метель
И прочая. Ее сомнений
Мартын Задека не решит;
Но сон зловещий ей сулит
Печальных много приключений.
Дней несколько она потом
Все беспокоилась о том.

XXV

Но вот багряною рукою 34
Заря от утренних долин
Выводит с солнцем за собою
Веселый праздник именин.
С утра дом Лариных гостями
Весь полон; целыми семьями
Соседи съехались в возках,
В кибитках, в бричках и в санях.
В передней толкотня, тревога;
В гостиной встреча новых лиц,
Лай мосек, чмоканье девиц,
Шум, хохот, давка у порога,
Поклоны, шарканье гостей,
Кормилиц крик и плач детей.

XXVI

С своей супругою дородной
Приехал толстый Пустяков;
Гвоздин, хозяин превосходный,
Владелец нищих мужиков;
Скотинины, чета седая,
С детьми всех возрастов, считая
От тридцати до двух годов;
Уездный франтик Петушков,
Мой брат двоюродный, Буянов,
В пуху, в картузе с козырьком 35
(Как вам, конечно, он знаком),
И отставной советник Флянов,
Тяжелый сплетник, старый плут,
Обжора, взяточник и шут.

XXVII

С семьей Панфила Харликова
Приехал и мосье Трике,
Остряк, недавно из Тамбова,
В очках и в рыжем парике.
Как истинный француз, в кармане
Трике привез куплет Татьяне
На голос, знаемый детьми:
Reveillez vous, belle endormie.
Меж ветхих песен альманаха
Был напечатан сей куплет;
Трике, догадливый поэт,
Его на свет явил из праха,
И смело вместо belle Nina
Поставил belle Tatiana.

XXVIII

И вот из ближнего посада
Созревших барышень кумир,
Уездных матушек отрада,
Приехал ротный командир;
Вошел… Ах, новость, да какая!
Музыка будет полковая!
Полковник сам ее послал.
Какая радость: будет бал!
Девчонки прыгают заране; 36
Но кушать подали. Четой
Идут за стол рука с рукой.
Теснятся барышни к Татьяне;
Мужчины против; и, крестясь,
Толпа жужжит, за стол садясь.

XXIX

На миг умолкли разговоры;
Уста жуют. Со всех сторон
Гремят тарелки и приборы
Да рюмок раздается звон.
Но вскоре гости понемногу
Подъемлют общую тревогу.
Никто не слушает, кричат,
Смеются, спорят и пищат.
Вдруг двери настежь. Ленский входит,
И с ним Онегин. «Ах, творец! —
Кричит хозяйка: — наконец!»
Теснятся гости, всяк отводит
Приборы, стулья поскорей;
Зовут, сажают двух друзей.

XXX

Сажают прямо против Тани,
И, утренней луны бледней
И трепетней гонимой лани,
Она темнеющих очей
Не подымает: пышет бурно
В ней страстный жар; ей душно, дурно;
Она приветствий двух друзей
Не слышит, слезы из очей
Хотят уж капать; уж готова
Бедняжка в обморок упасть;
Но воля и рассудка власть
Превозмогли. Она два слова
Сквозь зубы молвила тишком
И усидела за столом.

XXXI

Траги-нервичсских явлений,
Девичьих обмороков, слез
Давно терпеть не мог Евгений:
Довольно их он перенес.
Чудак, попав на пир огромный,
Уж был сердит. Но девы томной
Заметя трепетный порыв,
С досады взоры опустив,
Надулся он и, негодуя,
Поклялся Ленского взбесить
И уж порядком отомстить.
Теперь, заране торжествуя,
Он стал чертить в душе своей
Карикатуры всех гостей.

XXXII

Конечно, не один Евгений
Смятенье Тани видеть мог;
Но целью взоров и суждений
В то время жирный был пирог
(К несчастию, пересоленный);
Да вот в бутылке засмоленной,
Между жарким и блан-манже,
Цимлянское несут уже;
За ним строй рюмок узких, длинных,
Подобно талии твоей,
Зизи, кристалл души моей,
Предмет стихов моих невинных,
Любви приманчивый фиал,
Ты, от кого я пьян бывал!

XXXIII

Освободясь от пробки влажной,
Бутылка хлопнула; вино
Шипит; и вот с осанкой важной,
Куплетом мучимый давно,
Трике встает; пред ним собранье
Хранит глубокое молчанье.
Татьяна чуть жива; Трике,
К ней обратясь с листком в руке,
Запел, фальшивя. Плески, клики
Его приветствуют. Она
Певцу присесть принуждена;
Поэт же скромный, хоть великий,
Ее здоровье первый пьет
И ей куплет передает.

XXXIV

Пошли приветы, поздравленья;
Татьяна всех благодарит.
Когда же дело до Евгенья
Дошло, то девы томный вид,
Ее смущение, усталость
В его душе родили жалость:
Он молча поклонился ей,
Но как-то взор его очей
Был чудно нежен. Оттого ли,
Что он и вправду тронут был,
Иль он, кокетствуя, шалил,
Невольно ль, иль из доброй воли,
Но взор сей нежность изъявил:
Он сердце Тани оживил.

XXXV

Гремят отдвинутые стулья;
Толпа в гостиную валит:
Так пчел из лакомого улья
На ниву шумный рой летит.
Довольный праздничным обедом,
Сосед сопит перед соседом;
Подсели дамы к камельку;
Девицы шепчут в уголку;
Столы зеленые раскрыты:
Зовут задорных игроков
Бостон и ломбер стариков,
И вист, доныне знаменитый,
Однообразная семья,
Все жадной скуки сыновья.

XXXVI

Уж восемь робертов сыграли
Герои виста; восемь раз
Они места переменяли;
И чай несут. Люблю я час
Определять обедом, чаем
И ужином. Мы время знаем
В деревне без больших сует:
Желудок — верный наш брегет;
И кстати я замечу в скобках,
Что речь веду в моих строфах
Я столь же часто о пирах,
О разных кушаньях и пробках,
Как ты, божественный Омир,
Ты, тридцати веков кумир!

XXXVII. XXXVIII. XXXIX

Но чай несут; девицы чинно
Едва за блюдички взялись,
Вдруг из-за двери в зале длинной
Фагот и флейта раздались.
Обрадован музыки громом,
Оставя чашку чаю с ромом,
Парис окружных городков,
Подходит к Ольге Петушков,
К Татьяне Ленский; Харликову,
Невесту переспелых лет,
Берет тамбовский мой поэт,
Умчал Буянов Пустякову,
И в залу высыпали все.
И бал блестит во всей красе.

XL

В начале моего романа
(Смотрите первую тетрадь)
Хотелось вроде мне Альбана
Бал петербургский описать;
Но, развлечен пустым мечтаньем,
Я занялся воспоминаньем
О ножках мне знакомых дам.
По вашим узеньким следам,
О ножки, полно заблуждаться!
С изменой юности моей
Пора мне сделаться умней,
В делах и в слоге поправляться,
И эту пятую тетрадь
От отступлений очищать.

XLI

Однообразный и безумный,
Как вихорь жизни молодой,
Кружится вальса вихорь шумный;
Чета мелькает за четой.
К минуте мщенья приближаясь,
Онегин, втайне усмехаясь,
Подходит к Ольге. Быстро с ней
Вертится около гостей,
Потом на стул ее сажает,
Заводит речь о том о сем;
Спустя минуты две потом
Вновь с нею вальс он продолжает;
Все в изумленье. Ленский сам
Не верит собственным глазам.

XLII

Мазурка раздалась. Бывало,
Когда гремел мазурки гром,
В огромной зале все дрожало,
Паркет трещал под каблуком,
Тряслися, дребезжали рамы;
Теперь не то: и мы, как дамы,
Скользим по лаковым доскам.
Но в городах, по деревням
Еще мазурка сохранила
Первоначальные красы:
Припрыжки, каблуки, усы
Всё те же: их не изменила
Лихая мода, наш тиран,
Недуг новейших россиян.

XLIII. XLIV

Буянов, братец мой задорный,
К герою нашему подвел
Татьяну с Ольгою; проворно
Онегин с Ольгою пошел;
Ведет ее, скользя небрежно,
И, наклонясь, ей шепчет нежно
Какой-то пошлый мадригал,
И руку жмет — и запылал
В ее лице самолюбивом
Румянец ярче. Ленский мой
Все видел: вспыхнул, сам не свой;
В негодовании ревнивом
Поэт конца мазурки ждет
И в котильон ее зовет.

XLV

Но ей нельзя. Нельзя? Но что же?
Да Ольга слово уж дала
Онегину. О боже, боже!
Что слышит он? Она могла…
Возможно ль? Чуть лишь из пеленок,
Кокетка, ветреный ребенок!
Уж хитрость ведает она,
Уж изменять научена!
Не в силах Ленский снесть удара;
Проказы женские кляня,
Выходит, требует коня
И скачет. Пистолетов пара,
Две пули — больше ничего —
Вдруг разрешат судьбу его.
Alexander Pushkin
0

Tags: Alexander Pushkin / Alexander Pushkin - Eugene Onegin
Add comment

Add comment

reload, if the code cannot be seen