Alexander Pushkin - Eugene Onegin (Chapter 4) / Евгений Онегин (4 часть)


in English

With womankind, the less we love them,
the easier they become to charm,
the tighter we can stretch above them
enticing nets to do them harm.
There was a period when cold-blooded
debauchery was praised, and studied
as love's technique, when it would blare
its own perfection everywhere,
and heartless pleasure was up-graded;
yes, these were our forefathers' ways,
those monkeys of the good old days:
now Lovelace's renown has faded
as scarlet heels have lost their name
and stately periwigs, their fame.

VIII

How dull are acting and evasion,
diversely urging the same plea,
earnestly striving for persuasion
on points that all long since agree --
and always the self-same objection;
how dull to work for the correction
of prejudice that's never been
harboured by maidens of thirteen!
Who's not disgusted by cajoling,
threats, vows, and simulated fears,
by six-page letters, rings and tears,
gossip, and tricks, and the patrolling
of aunts and mothers, and the thrall
of husband's friendship -- worst of all!

IX

Evgeny thought in just this fashion.
From his first youth he'd known the force,
the sufferings of tempestuous passion;
its winds had blown him far off course.
Spoilt by the habit of indulgence,
now dazzled by one thing's effulgence,
now disenchanted with the next,
more and more bored by yearning's text,
bored by success' giddy trifle,
he heard in stillness and in din
a deathless murmur from within,
found that in laughter yawns could stifle:
he killed eight years in such a style,
and wasted life's fine flower meanwhile.

X

Though belles had lost his adoration,
he danced attendance with the best;
rebuffed, found instant consolation;
deceived, was overjoyed to rest.
He followed them without illusion,
lost them without regret's contusion,
scarcely recalled their love, their spite;
just like a casual guest who might
devote to whist an evening party,
who'd sit, and at the end of play
would say goodbye and drive away,
go off to sleep quite hale and hearty,
and in the morning wouldn't know
that self-same evening where he'd go.

XI

Yet Tanya's note made its impression
on Eugene, he was deeply stirred:
that virgin dream and its confession
filled him with thoughts that swarmed and whirred;
the flower-like pallor of the maiden,
her look, so sweetly sorrow-laden,
all plunged his soul deep in the stream
of a delicious, guiltless dream...
and though perhaps old fires were thrusting
and held him briefly in their sway,
Eugene had no wish to betray
a soul so innocent, so trusting.
But to the garden, to the scene
where Tanya now confronts Eugene.

XII

Moments of silence, quite unbroken;
then, stepping nearer, Eugene said:
``You wrote to me, and nothing spoken
can disavow that. I have read
those words where love, without condition,
pours out its guiltless frank admission,
and your sincerity of thought
is dear to me, for it has brought
feeling to what had long been heartless:
but I won't praise you -- let me join
and pay my debt in the same coin
with an avowal just as artless;
hear my confession as I stand
I leave the verdict in your hand.

XIII

``Could I be happy circumscribing
my life in a domestic plot;
had fortune blest me by prescribing
husband and father as my lot;
could I accept for just a minute
the homely scene, take pleasure in it --
then I'd have looked for you alone
to be the bride I'd call my own.
Without romance, or false insistence,
I'll say: with past ideals in view
I would have chosen none but you
as helpmeet in my sad existence,
as gage of all things that were good,
and been as happy... as I could!

XIV

``But I was simply not intended
for happiness -- that alien role.
Should your perfections be expended
in vain on my unworthy soul?
Believe (as conscience is my warrant),
wedlock for us would be abhorrent.
I'd love you, but inside a day,
with custom, love would fade away;
your tears would flow -- but your emotion,
your grief would fail to touch my heart,
they'd just enrage it with their dart.
What sort of roses, in your notion,
would Hymen bring us -- blooms that might
last many a day, and many a night!

XV

``What in the world is more distressing
than households where the wife must moan
the unworthy husband through depressing
daytimes and evenings passed alone?
and where the husband, recognizing
her worth (but anathematising
his destiny) without a smile
bursts with cold envy and with bile?
For such am I. When you were speaking
to me so simply, with the fires
and force that purity inspires,
is this the man that you were seeking?
can it be true you must await
from cruel fortune such a fate?

XVI

``I've dreams and years past resurrection;
a soul that nothing can renew...
I feel a brotherly affection,
or something tenderer still, for you.
Listen to me without resentment:
girls often change to their contentment
light dreams for new ones... so we see
each springtime, on the growing tree,
fresh leaves... for such is heaven's mandate.
You'll love again, but you must teach
your heart some self-restraint; for each
and every man won't understand it
as I have... learn from my belief
that inexperience leads to grief.''

XVII

So went his sermon. Almost dying,
blinded to everything about
by mist of tears, without replying
Tatyana heard Evgeny out.
He gave his arm. In sad abstraction,
by what's called machinal reaction,
without a word Tatyana leant
upon it, and with head down-bent
walked homeward round the kitchen garden;
together they arrived, and none
dreamt of reproving what they'd done:
by country freedom, rightful pardon
and happy licence are allowed,
as much as in Moscow the proud.

XVIII

Agree, the way Eugene proceeded
with our poor girl was kind and good;
not for the first time he succeeded
in manifesting, as he could,
a truly noble disposition;
yet people's malice and suspicion
persisted and made no amends.
By enemies, no less by friends
(it's all the same -- you well correct us),
he found all kinds of brickbat hurled.
We each have enemies in this world,
but from our friends, good Lord protect us!
Those friends, those friends! it is, I fear,
with cause that I've recalled them here.

XIX

What of it? Nothing. I'm just sending
to sleep some black and empty dreams;
but, inside brackets, I'm contending
there's no ignoble tale that seems
cooked-up where garret-vermin babble,
endorsed by fashionable rabble,
there's no absurdity as such,
no vulgar epigram too much,
which smilingly your friend, supported
by decent company, has not,
without a trace of spite or plot,
a hundred times afresh distorted;
yet he'd back you through thick and thin:
he loves you... like your kith and kin!

XX

Hm, hm. Distinguished reader, tell me
how are your kith and kin today?
And here my sentiments impel me
for your enlightenment to say
how I interpret this expression:
our kin are folk whom by profession
we have to cherish and admire
with all our hearts, and who require
that in the usual Christmas scrimmage
we visit them, or without fail
send them good wishes through the mail
to ensure that till next time our image
won't even cross their minds by stealth...
God grant them years and years of health!

XXI

Of course, the love of tender beauties,
surer than friendship or than kin,
will loyally discharge its duties,
in midst of trouble, storm or din.
Of course. Yet fashion's wild rotation,
yet a capricious inclination,
yet floods of talk around the town...
the darling sex is light as down.
Then verdicts from her husband's quartet
are bound, by every virtuous wife,
to be respected all through life:
and so your faithfullest supporter
will disappear as fast as smoke:
for Satan, love's a splendid joke.

XXII

Whom then to credit? Whom to treasure?
On whom alone can we depend?
Who is there who will truly measure
his acts and words to suit our end?
Who'll sow no calumnies around us?
Whose fond attentions will astound us?
Who'll never fault our vices, or
whom shall we never find a bore?
Don't let a ghost be your bear-leader,
don't waste your efforts on the air.
Just let yourself be your whole care,
your loved one, honourable reader!
Deserving object: there can be
nothing more lovable than he.

XXIII

Then what resulted from the meeting?
Alas, it's not so hard to guess!
Love's frantic torments went on beating
and racking with their strain and stress
that youthful soul, which pined for sadness;
no, all devoured by passion's madness
poor Tanya more intensely burns;
sleep runs from her, she turns and turns...
and health, life's sweetness and its shimmer,
smiles, and a maiden's tranquil poise,
have vanished, like an empty noise,
while dear Tatyana's youth grows dimmer:
so a storm-shadow wraps away
in dark attire the new-born day.

XXIV

Poor Tanya's bloom begins to languish,
and pale, and fade without a word!
there's nothing can employ her anguish,
no sound by which her soul is stirred.
Neighbours in whispered tones are taking
council, and with profound head-shaking
conclude that it's high time she wed!...
But that's enough. At once, in stead,
I'll gladden your imagination,
reader, by painting you a scene
of happy love. For I have been
too long, against my inclination,
held in constraint by pity's touch:
I love my Tatyana too much!

XXV

From hour to hour a surer capture
for Olga's beauty, Lensky gives
his soul to a delicious rapture
that fills him and in which he lives.
He's always with her: either seated
in darkness in her room, or treated
to garden walks, as arm in arm
they while away the morning's calm.
What else? Quite drunk with love's illusion,
he even dares, once in a while,
emboldened by his Olga's smile,
and plunged in tender shame's confusion,
to play with a dishevelled tress,
or kiss the border of her dress.

XXVI

He reads to Olga on occasion,
for her improvement, a roman,
of moralistical persuasion,
more searching than Chateaubriand;
but in it there are certain pages
(vain twaddle, fables of the ages,
talk that might turn a young girl's head)
which with a blush he leaves unread.
As far removed as they were able
from all the world, they sat and pored
in deepest thought at the chess-board
for hours, with elbows on the table --
then Lensky moved his pawn, and took,
deep in distraction, his own rook.

XXVII

Even at home his occupation
is only Olga: he relieves
with careful schemes of decoration
an album's loose and floating sheaves.
Sometimes a landscape's represented,
a tomb, a Cyprian shrine's invented,
a lyre, and on it perched, a dove --
in ink with colour-wash above;
then on the leaves of recollection,
below the others who have signed
he leaves a tender verse behind,
a dream's mute monument, reflection
of instant thoughts, a fleeting trace
still after many years in place.

XXVIII

Often of course you'll have inspected
the album of a country miss
where scribbling friends have interjected
frontwise and back, that way and this.
With spelling scrambled to perdition,
the unmetric verses of tradition
are entered here, in friendship's gage,
shortened, or lengthened off the page.
On the first sheet you'll find a question:
``Qu'ecrirez-vous sur ces tablettes?''
and, under, ``toute a vous Annette'';
then, on the last page, the suggestion:
``who loves you more than I, let's see
him prove it, writing after me.''

XXIX

There you're entirely sure of finding
two hearts, a torch, and a nosegay;
and there, love's protestations, binding
until the tombstone; there one day
some regimental bard has added
a stanza villainously padded.
In such an album, friends, I too
am always glad to write, it's true,
convinced at heart that my most zealous
nonsense will earn indulgent looks,
nor will my scribbling in such books
attract the sneering of the jealous,
or make men seriously discuss
if I show wit in jesting thus.

XXX

But you, grand tomes I loathe with passion,
odd volumes from the devil's shelf,
in which the rhymester-man-of-fashion
is forced to crucify himself,
portfolios nobly illustrated
with Tolstoy's2 brush, or decorated
by Baratynsky's3 wondrous pen,
God's thunder burn you up! And when
some splendid lady is referring
to me her best in-quarto tome,
the fear and rage with which I foam!
Deep down, an epigram is stirring
that I'm just longing to indite --
but madrigals I've got to write!

XXXI

No madrigals were for inscribing
by Lensky in his Olga's book;
his style breathed love, and not the gibing
coldness of wit; each note he took,
each news of her he'd been imbibing --
all was material for transcribing:
with lively and pellucid look,
his elegies flow like a brook.
So you, inspired Yazykov,4 sobbing
with bursts of passion from the heart,
sing God knows whom, compose with art
a suite of elegies that, throbbing,
sooner or later will relate
the entire story of your fate.

XXXII

But soft! You hear? A scowling critic,
bidding us to reject for good
the elegy, grown paralytic,
commands our rhymester-brotherhood:
``oh, quit your stale, your tedious quacking,
and your alas-ing and alack-ing
about what's buried in the past:
sing about something else at last!''
All right, you want the resurrection
of trumpet, dagger, mask and sword,
and dead ideas from that old hoard,
all brought to life at your direction.
Not so? ``No, sirs, the ode's the thing,
that's the refrain that you should sing,

XXXIII

``as sung of old, in years of glory,
as instituted long ago.''
Only the ode, that solemn story!
Enough, my friends; it's all so-so.
Remember the retort satiric!
Is Others' View,5 that clever lyric,
really more bearable to you
than what our sorrowing rhymesters do?
``The elegy's just vain protesting,
empty the purpose it proclaims,
while odes have high and noble aims...''
That point I wouldn't mind contesting,
but hold my tongue, lest it appears
I'll set two ages by the ears.

XXXIV

In love with fame, by freedom smitten,
with storm and tumult in his head,
what odes Vladimir might have written --
but Olga would have never read!
Bards of our tearful generation,
have you read lines of your creation
to your loved ones? They do maintain
that this of all things for a swain
is the supreme reward. Precisely,
blest the poor lover who reads out
his dreams, while she whom they're about,
that languid beauty, listens nicely --
blest... though perhaps her fancy's caught
in fact by some quite different thought.

XXXV

But I myself read my bedizened
fancies, my rhythmic search for truth,
to nobody except a wizened
nanny, companion of my youth;
or, after some dull dinner's labour,
I buttonhole a wandering neighbour
and in a corner make him choke
on tragedy; but it's no joke,
when, utterly worn out by rhyming,
exhausted and done up, I take
a rambling walk beside my lake,
and duck get up; with instant timing,
alarmed by my melodious lay,
they leave their shores and fly away.

XXXVI6

< My gaze pursues them... but on station
the hunter in the wood will swear
at verse, and hiss an imprecation,
and ease his catch with all due care.
We each enjoy a special hobby,
each of us has his favourite lobby:
one sees a duck and aims his gun,
one raves in verse like me, and one
hunts cheeky flies, with swatter sweeping,
one leads the multitude in thought,
one finds in war amusing sport,
one wallows in delicious weeping;
the wine-addict adores the cup:
and good and bad are all mixed up. >

XXXVII

But what about Eugene? With reason
reader, you ask, and I'll expound --
craving your tolerance in season --
the programme of his daily round.
In summertime -- for he was leading
a hermit's life -- he'd be proceeding
on foot, by seven o'clock, until
he reached the stream below the hill;
lightly attired, like the creator
of Gulnare, he would play a card
out of the hand of that same bard:
he'd swim this Hellespont; then later
he'd drink his coffee, flutter through
the pages of some dull review,
then dress...

(XXXVIII) XXXIX

Books, riding, walks, sleep heavy-laden,
the shady wood, the talking stream;
sometimes from a fair, black-eyed maiden
the kiss where youth and freshness gleam;
a steed responsive to the bridle,
and dinner with a touch of idle
fancy, a wine serene in mood,
tranquillity, and solitude --
Onegin's life, you see, was holy;
unconsciously he let it mount
its grip on him, forgot to count
bright summer days that passed so slowly,
forgot to think of town and friends
and tedious means to festive ends.

XL

Our evanescent northern summer
parodies winter in the south;
it's like a vanishing newcomer --
but here we must control our mouth.
The sky breathed autumn, time was flowing,
and good old sun more seldom glowing;
the days grew shorter, in the glade
with mournful sound the secret shade
was stripped away, and mists encroaching
lay on the fields; in caravan
the clamorous honking geese began
their southward flight: one saw approaching
the season which is such a bore --
November stood outside the door.

XLI

Dawn comes in mist and chill; no longer
do fields echo with work and shout;
in pairs, their hunger driving stronger,
on the highroad the wolves come out;
the horse gets wind of them and, snorting,
sets the wise traveller cavorting
up the hillside at breakneck pace;
no longer does the herdsman chase
his beasts outdoors at dawn, nor ringing
at noontime does his horn resound
as it assembles them around;
while in the hut a girl is singing;
she spins and, friend of winter nights,
the matchwood chatters as it lights.

XLII

Hoar-frost that crackles with a will is
already silvering all the plain...
(the reader thinks the rhyme is lilies:
here, seize it quick for this quatrain!)
Like modish parquetry, the river
glitters beneath its icing-sliver;
boy-tribes with skates on loudly slice
their joyous way across the ice;
a red-foot goose, weight something fearful,
anticipates a swim, in stead
tries out the ice with cautious tread,
and skids and tumbles down; the cheerful
first flakes of snow whirl round and sink
in stars upon the river-brink.

XLIII

In backwoods, how d'you pass this season?
Walking? The country that you roam
is a compulsive bore by reason
of its unvarnished monochrome.
Riding on the lugubrious prairie?
Your horse, blunt-shoed and all unwary,
will find the ice elude his grip
and, any moment, down he'll slip.
Or, in your lonely homestead, moping,
you'll read: here's Pradt,7 here's Walter Scott!
to pass the evening. No? then tot
up your accounts, and raging, toping,
let evening pass, tomorrow too --
in triumph you'll see winter through!

XLIV

Childe-Harold-like, Eugene's devoting
his hours to dreaming them away:
he wakes; a bath where ice is floating;
and then, indoors the livelong day,
alone, and sunk in calculation,
with a blunt cue for the duration,
from early morning on he will
at two-ball billiards prove his skill;
then, country evening fast arriving,
billiards are dropped, cue put to bed:
before the fire a table's spread;
Evgeny waits: and here comes driving,
with three roan horses in a line
Vladimir Lensky. Quick, let's dine!

XLV

From widow Clicquot and from Moet,
the draught whose blessings are agreed,
in frosted bottle, for the poet
is brought to table at full speed.
Bubbles like Hippocrene are spraying;
once, with its foaming and its playing,
(a simile of this and that)
it held me captive; tit for tat,
friends, recollect how I surrendered
my last poor lepton for a sup!
recall, by its bewitching cup,
how many follies were engendered;
how many lines of verse, and themes
for jokes, and rows, and merry dreams!

XLVI

Yet hissing froth deals a malicious,
perfidious blow to my inside,
and now it's Bordeaux the Judicious
that I prefer to Champagne's tide;
to Ay's vintage in the sequel
I find myself no longer equal;
for, mistress-like, it's brilliant, vain,
lively, capricious, and inane...
But in misfortune or displeasure,
Bordeaux, you're like a faithful friend,
a true companion to the end,
ready to share our quiet leisure
with your good offices, and so
long life to our dear friend, Bordeaux!

XLVII

The fire was dying; cinders faintly
covered the golden coal -- the steam
tumbled and whirled and twisted quaintly
its barely noticeable stream.
The hearth was low beyond all stoking.
Straight up the chimney, pipes were smoking.
Still on the board, the beakers hissed,
and evening now drew on in mist...
(I like a friendly conversation,
the enjoyment of a friendly drink,
at hours, which, why I cannot think,
somehow have got the designation
of time between the wolf and dog.)
Now hear the friends in dialogue:

XLVIII

``Tell me, our neighbours, are they thriving?
and how's Tatyana? Olga too,
your dashing one, is she surviving?''
``Just half a glass more... that will do...
All flourishing; they send their duty.
Take Olga's shoulders now -- the beauty!
What breasts! What soul!... We'll go one day
visit the family, what d'you say?
if you come with me, they'll be flattered;
or else, my friend, how does it look?
you called there twice, and since then took
no notice of them. But I've chattered
so much, I'm left no time to speak!
of course! you're bidden there next week.''

XLIX

``I?'' ``Saturday. The invitation
Olinka and her mother sent:
Tatyana's name day celebration.
It's right and proper that you went.''
``But there'll be such a rout and scrabble
with every different kind of rabble...''
``No, no, I'm sure the party's small.
Relations. No-one else at all.
Let's go, our friendship's worth the labour!''
``All right, I'll come then...'' ``What a friend!''
He drained his glass down to the end
by way of toast to their fair neighbour;
then he began to talk once more
of Olga: love's that kind of bore!

L

Lensky rejoiced. His designated
rapture was just two weeks ahead;
love's crown, delectable, awaited
his transports, and the marriage-bed
in all its mystery. Hymen's teasing,
the pain, the grief, the marrow-freezing
onset of the incipient yawn,
were from his vision quite withdrawn.
While under the connubial banner
I can see naught, as Hymen's foe,
beyond a string of dull tableaux,
a novel in Lafontaine's8 manner...
my wretched Lensky in his heart
was just created for the part.

LI

And he was loved... at least he never
doubted of it, so lived in bliss.
Happy a hundredfold, whoever
can lean on faith, who can dismiss
cold reason, sleep in sensual welter
like a drunk traveller in a shelter,
or, sweeter, like a butterfly
in flowers of spring it's drinking dry:
but piteous he, the all-foreseeing,
the sober head, detesting each
human reaction, every speech
in the expression of its being,
whose heart experience has cooled
and saved from being charmed or fooled!

Notes to Chapter Four

1 Stanzas I to VI were discarded by Pushkin.
2 Count F. P. Tolstoy (1783-1873), well-known artist.
3 See Chapter Three, note 13.
4 Poet and acquaintance of Pushkin.
5 Satiric poem by Ivan Dimitriev, 1795. The reference is -- summarizing
very briefly -- to a controversy between different literary cliques about
the relative merits of the classic ode and the romantic elegy.
6 Stanza discarded by Pushkin, also stanza XXXVIII.
7 Dominique de Pradt (1759-1837), voluminous French political writer.
8 August Lafontaine (1758-1851), German novelist of family life.

in Russian

Чем меньше женщину мы любим,
Тем легче нравимся мы ей
И тем ее вернее губим
Средь обольстительных сетей.
Разврат, бывало, хладнокровный
Наукой славился любовной,
Сам о себе везде трубя
И наслаждаясь не любя.
Но эта важная забава
Достойна старых обезьян
Хваленых дедовских времян:
Ловласов обветшала слава
Со славой красных каблуков
И величавых париков.

VIII

Кому не скучно лицемерить,
Различно повторять одно,
Стараться важно в том уверить,
В чем все уверены давно,
Всё те же слышать возраженья,
Уничтожать предрассужденья,
Которых не было и нет
У девочки в тринадцать лет!
Кого не утомят угрозы,
Моленья, клятвы, мнимый страх,
Записки на шести листах,
Обманы, сплетни, кольцы, слезы,
Надзоры теток, матерей
И дружба тяжкая мужей!

IX

Так точно думал мой Евгений.
Он в первой юности своей
Был жертвой бурных заблуждений
И необузданных страстей.
Привычкой жизни избалован,
Одним на время очарован,
Разочарованный другим,
Желаньем медленно томим,
Томим и ветреным успехом,
Внимая в шуме и в тиши
Роптанье вечное души,
Зевоту подавляя смехом:
Вот как убил он восемь лет,
Утратя жизни лучший цвет.

X

В красавиц он уж не влюблялся,
А волочился как-нибудь;
Откажут — мигом утешался;
Изменят — рад был отдохнуть.
Он их искал без упоенья,
А оставлял без сожаленья,
Чуть помня их любовь и злость.
Так точно равнодушный гость
На вист вечерний приезжает,
Садится; кончилась игра:
Он уезжает со двора,
Спокойно дома засыпает
И сам не знает поутру,
Куда поедет ввечеру.

XI

Но, получив посланье Тани,
Онегин живо тронут был:
Язык девических мечтаний
В нем думы роем возмутил;
И вспомнил он Татьяны милой
И бледный цвет и вид унылый;
И в сладостный, безгрешный сон
Душою погрузился он.
Быть может, чувствий пыл старинный
Им на минуту овладел;
Но обмануть он не хотел
Доверчивость души невинной.
Теперь мы в сад перелетим,
Где встретилась Татьяна с ним.

XII

Минуты две они молчали,
Но к ней Онегин подошел
И молвил: «Вы ко мне писали,
Не отпирайтесь. Я прочел
Души доверчивой признанья,
Любви невинной излиянья;
Мне ваша искренность мила;
Она в волненье привела
Давно умолкнувшие чувства;
Но вас хвалить я не хочу;
Я за нее вам отплачу
Признаньем также без искусства;
Примите исповедь мою:
Себя на суд вам отдаю.

XIII

Когда бы жизнь домашним кругом
Я ограничить захотел;
Когда б мне быть отцом, супругом
Приятный жребий повелел;
Когда б семейственной картиной
Пленился я хоть миг единый, —
То, верно б, кроме вас одной
Невесты не искал иной.
Скажу без блесток мадригальных:
Нашед мой прежний идеал,
Я, верно б, вас одну избрал
В подруги дней моих печальных,
Всего прекрасного в залог,
И был бы счастлив… сколько мог!

XIV

Но я не создан для блаженства;
Ему чужда душа моя;
Напрасны ваши совершенства:
Их вовсе недостоин я.
Поверьте (совесть в том порукой),
Супружество нам будет мукой.
Я, сколько ни любил бы вас,
Привыкнув, разлюблю тотчас;
Начнете плакать: ваши слезы
Не тронут сердца моего,
А будут лишь бесить его.
Судите ж вы, какие розы
Нам заготовит Гименей
И, может быть, на много дней.

XV

Что может быть на свете хуже
Семьи, где бедная жена
Грустит о недостойном муже,
И днем и вечером одна;
Где скучный муж, ей цену зная
(Судьбу, однако ж, проклиная),
Всегда нахмурен, молчалив,
Сердит и холодно-ревнив!
Таков я. И того ль искали
Вы чистой, пламенной душой,
Когда с такою простотой,
С таким умом ко мне писали?
Ужели жребий вам такой
Назначен строгою судьбой?

XVI

Мечтам и годам нет возврата;
Не обновлю души моей…
Я вас люблю любовью брата
И, может быть, еще нежней.
Послушайте ж меня без гнева:
Сменит не раз младая дева
Мечтами легкие мечты;
Так деревцо свои листы
Меняет с каждою весною.
Так видно небом суждено.
Полюбите вы снова: но…
Учитесь властвовать собою;
Не всякий вас, как я, поймет;
К беде неопытность ведет».

XVII

Так проповедовал Евгений.
Сквозь слез не видя ничего,
Едва дыша, без возражений,
Татьяна слушала его.
Он подал руку ей. Печально
(Как говорится, машинально)
Татьяна молча оперлась,
Головкой томною склонясь;
Пошли домой вкруг огорода;
Явились вместе, и никто
Не вздумал им пенять на то.
Имеет сельская свобода
Свои счастливые права,
Как и надменная Москва.

XVIII

Вы согласитесь, мой читатель,
Что очень мило поступил
С печальной Таней наш приятель;
Не в первый раз он тут явил
Души прямое благородство,
Хотя людей недоброхотство
В нем не щадило ничего:
Враги его, друзья его
(Что, может быть, одно и то же)
Его честили так и сяк.
Врагов имеет в мире всяк,
Но от друзей спаси нас, боже!
Уж эти мне друзья, друзья!
Об них недаром вспомнил я.

XIX

А что? Да так. Я усыпляю
Пустые, черные мечты;
Я только в скобках замечаю,
Что нет презренной клеветы,
На чердаке вралем рожденной
И светской чернью ободренной,
Что нет нелепицы такой,
Ни эпиграммы площадной,
Которой бы ваш друг с улыбкой,
В кругу порядочных людей,
Без всякой злобы и затей,
Не повторил стократ ошибкой;
А впрочем, он за вас горой:
Он вас так любит… как родной!

XX

Гм! гм! Читатель благородный,
Здорова ль ваша вся родня?
Позвольте: может быть, угодно
Теперь узнать вам от меня,
Что значит именно родные.
Родные люди вот какие:
Мы их обязаны ласкать,
Любить, душевно уважать
И, по обычаю народа,
О рождестве их навещать
Или по почте поздравлять,
Чтоб остальное время года
Не думали о нас они…
Итак, дай бог им долги дни!

XXI

Зато любовь красавиц нежных
Надежней дружбы и родства:
Над нею и средь бурь мятежных
Вы сохраняете права.
Конечно так. Но вихорь моды,
Но своенравие природы,
Но мненья светского поток…
А милый пол, как пух, легок.
К тому ж и мнения супруга
Для добродетельной жены
Всегда почтенны быть должны;
Так ваша верная подруга
Бывает вмиг увлечена:
Любовью шутит сатана.

XXII

Кого ж любить? Кому же верить?
Кто не изменит нам один?
Кто все дела, все речи мерит
Услужливо на наш аршин?
Кто клеветы про нас не сеет?
Кто нас заботливо лелеет?
Кому порок наш не беда?
Кто не наскучит никогда?
Призрака суетный искатель,
Трудов напрасно не губя,
Любите самого себя,
Достопочтенный мой читатель!
Предмет достойный: ничего
Любезней, верно, нет его.

XXIII

Что было следствием свиданья?
Увы, не трудно угадать!
Любви безумные страданья
Не перестали волновать
Младой души, печали жадной;
Нет, пуще страстью безотрадной
Татьяна бедная горит;
Ее постели сон бежит;
Здоровье, жизни цвет и сладость,
Улыбка, девственный покой,
Пропало все, что звук пустой,
И меркнет милой Тани младость:
Так одевает бури тень
Едва рождающийся день.

XXIV

Увы, Татьяна увядает,
Бледнеет, гаснет и молчит!
Ничто ее не занимает,
Ее души не шевелит.
Качая важно головою,
Соседи шепчут меж собою:
Пора, пора бы замуж ей!..
Но полно. Надо мне скорей
Развеселить воображенье
Картиной счастливой любви.
Невольно, милые мои,
Меня стесняет сожаленье;
Простите мне: я так люблю
Татьяну милую мою!

XXV

Час от часу плененный боле
Красами Ольги молодой,
Владимир сладостной неволе
Предался полною душой.
Он вечно с ней. В ее покое
Они сидят в потемках двое;
Они в саду, рука с рукой,
Гуляют утренней порой;
И что ж? Любовью упоенный,
В смятенье нежного стыда,
Он только смеет иногда,
Улыбкой Ольги ободренный,
Развитым локоном играть
Иль край одежды целовать.

XXVI

Он иногда читает Оле
Нравоучительный роман,
В котором автор знает боле
Природу, чем Шатобриан,
А между тем две, три страницы
(Пустые бредни, небылицы,
Опасные для сердца дев)
Он пропускает, покраснев.
Уединясь от всех далеко,
Они над шахматной доской,
На стол облокотясь, порой
Сидят, задумавшись глубоко,
И Ленский пешкою ладью
Берет в рассеянье свою.

XXVII

Поедет ли домой, и дома
Он занят Ольгою своей.
Летучие листки альбома
Прилежно украшает ей:
То в них рисует сельски виды,
Надгробный камень, храм Киприды,
Или на лире голубка
Пером и красками слегка;
То на листках воспоминанья
Пониже подписи других
Он оставляет нежный стих,
Безмолвный памятник мечтанья,
Мгновенной думы долгий след,
Все тот же после многих лет.

XXVIII

Конечно, вы не раз видали
Уездной барышни альбом,
Что все подружки измарали
С конца, с начала и кругом.
Сюда, назло правописанью,
Стихи без меры, по преданью
В знак дружбы верной внесены,
Уменьшены, продолжены.
На первом листике встречаешь
Qu’ecrirez-vous sur ces tablettes,
И подпись: t. a v. Annette;
А на последнем прочитаешь:
«Кто любит более тебя,
Пусть пишет далее меня».

XXIX

Тут непременно вы найдете
Два сердца, факел и цветки;
Тут верно клятвы вы прочтете
В любви до гробовой доски;
Какой-нибудь пиит армейский
Тут подмахнул стишок злодейский.
В такой альбом, мои друзья,
Признаться, рад писать и я,
Уверен будучи душою,
Что всякий мой усердный вздор
Заслужит благосклонный взор
И что потом с улыбкой злою
Не станут важно разбирать,
Остро иль нет я мог соврать.

XXX

Но вы, разрозненные томы
Из библиотеки чертей,
Великолепные альбомы,
Мученье модных рифмачей,
Вы, украшенные проворно
Толстого кистью чудотворной
Иль Баратынского пером,
Пускай сожжет вас божий гром!
Когда блистательная дама
Мне свой in-quarto подает,
И дрожь и злость меня берет,
И шевелится эпиграмма
Во глубине моей души,
А мадригалы им пиши!

XXXI

Не мадригалы Ленский пишет
В альбоме Ольги молодой;
Его перо любовью дышит,
Не хладно блещет остротой;
Что ни заметит, ни услышит
Об Ольге, он про то и пишет:
И, полны истины живой,
Текут элегии рекой.
Так ты, Языков вдохновенный,
В порывах сердца своего,
Поешь бог ведает кого,
И свод элегий драгоценный
Представит некогда тебе
Всю повесть о твоей судьбе.

XXXII

Но тише! Слышишь? Критик строгий
Повелевает сбросить нам
Элегии венок убогий,
И нашей братье рифмачам
Кричит: «Да перестаньте плакать,
И всё одно и то же квакать,
Жалеть о прежнем, о былом:
Довольно, пойте о другом!»
— Ты прав, и верно нам укажешь
Трубу, личину и кинжал,
И мыслей мертвый капитал
Отвсюду воскресить прикажешь:
Не так ли, друг? — Ничуть. Куда!
«Пишите оды, господа,

XXXIII

Как их писали в мощны годы,
Как было встарь заведено…»
— Одни торжественные оды!
И, полно, друг; не все ль равно?
Припомни, что сказал сатирик!
«Чужого толка» хитрый лирик
Ужели для тебя сносней
Унылых наших рифмачей? —
«Но всё в элегии ничтожно;
Пустая цель ее жалка;
Меж тем цель оды высока
И благородна…» Тут бы можно
Поспорить нам, но я молчу:
Два века ссорить не хочу.

XXXIV

Поклонник славы и свободы,
В волненье бурных дум своих,
Владимир и писал бы оды,
Да Ольга не читала их.
Случалось ли поэтам слезным
Читать в глаза своим любезным
Свои творенья? Говорят,
Что в мире выше нет наград.
И впрям, блажен любовник скромный,
Читающий мечты свои
Предмету песен и любви,
Красавице приятно-томной!
Блажен… хоть, может быть, она
Совсем иным развлечена.

XXXV

Но я плоды моих мечтаний
И гармонических затей
Читаю только старой няне,
Подруге юности моей,
Да после скучного обеда
Ко мне забредшего соседа,
Поймав нежданно за полу,
Душу трагедией в углу,
Или (но это кроме шуток),
Тоской и рифмами томим,
Бродя над озером моим,
Пугаю стадо диких уток:
Вняв пенью сладкозвучных строф,
Они слетают с берегов.

XXXVI. XXXVII

А что ж Онегин? Кстати, братья!
Терпенья вашего прошу:
Его вседневные занятья
Я вам подробно опишу.
Онегин жил анахоретом:
В седьмом часу вставал он летом
И отправлялся налегке
К бегущей под горой реке;
Певцу Гюльнары подражая,
Сей Геллеспонт переплывал,
Потом свой кофе выпивал,
Плохой журнал перебирая,
И одевался…

XXXVIII. XXXIX

Прогулки, чтенье, сон глубокой,
Лесная тень, журчанье струй,
Порой белянки черноокой
Младой и свежий поцелуй,
Узде послушный конь ретивый,
Обед довольно прихотливый,
Бутылка светлого вина,
Уединенье, тишина:
Вот жизнь Онегина святая;
И нечувствительно он ей
Предался, красных летних дней
В беспечной неге не считая,
Забыв и город, и друзей,
И скуку праздничных затей.

XL

Но наше северное лето,
Карикатура южных зим,
Мелькнет и нет: известно это,
Хоть мы признаться не хотим.
Уж небо осенью дышало,
Уж реже солнышко блистало,
Короче становился день,
Лесов таинственная сень
С печальным шумом обнажалась,
Ложился на поля туман,
Гусей крикливых караван
Тянулся к югу: приближалась
Довольно скучная пора;
Стоял ноябрь уж у двора.

XLI

Встает заря во мгле холодной;
На нивах шум работ умолк;
С своей волчихою голодной
Выходит на дорогу волк;
Его почуя, конь дорожный
Храпит — и путник осторожный
Несется в гору во весь дух;
На утренней заре пастух
Не гонит уж коров из хлева,
И в час полуденный в кружок
Их не зовет его рожок;
В избушке распевая, дева 23
Прядет, и, зимних друг ночей,
Трещит лучинка перед ней.

XLII

И вот уже трещат морозы
И серебрятся средь полей…
(Читатель ждет уж рифмы розы;
На, вот возьми ее скорей!)
Опрятней модного паркета
Блистает речка, льдом одета.
Мальчишек радостный народ 24
Коньками звучно режет лед;
На красных лапках гусь тяжелый,
Задумав плыть по лону вод,
Ступает бережно на лед,
Скользит и падает; веселый
Мелькает, вьется первый снег,
Звездами падая на брег.

XLIII

В глуши что делать в эту пору?
Гулять? Деревня той порой
Невольно докучает взору
Однообразной наготой.
Скакать верхом в степи суровой?
Но конь, притупленной подковой
Неверный зацепляя лед,
Того и жди, что упадет.
Сиди под кровлею пустынной,
Читай: вот Прадт, вот W. Scott.
Не хочешь? — поверяй расход,
Сердись иль пей, и вечер длинный
Кой-как пройдет, а завтра тож,
И славно зиму проведешь.

XLIV

Прямым Онегин Чильд-Гарольдом
Вдался в задумчивую лень:
Со сна садится в ванну со льдом,
И после, дома целый день,
Один, в расчеты погруженный,
Тупым кием вооруженный,
Он на бильярде в два шара
Играет с самого утра.
Настанет вечер деревенский:
Бильярд оставлен, кий забыт,
Перед камином стол накрыт,
Евгений ждет: вот едет Ленский
На тройке чалых лошадей;
Давай обедать поскорей!

XLV

Вдовы Клико или Моэта
Благословенное вино
В бутылке мерзлой для поэта
На стол тотчас принесено.
Оно сверкает Ипокреной; 25
Оно своей игрой и пеной
(Подобием того-сего)
Меня пленяло: за него
Последний бедный лепт, бывало,
Давал я. Помните ль, друзья?
Его волшебная струя
Рождала глупостей не мало,
А сколько шуток и стихов,
И споров, и веселых снов!

XLVI

Но изменяет пеной шумной
Оно желудку моему,
И я Бордо благоразумный
Уж нынче предпочел ему.
К Аи я больше не способен;
Аи любовнице подобен
Блестящей, ветреной, живой,
И своенравной, и пустой…
Но ты, Бордо, подобен другу,
Который, в горе и в беде,
Товарищ завсегда, везде,
Готов нам оказать услугу
Иль тихий разделить досуг.
Да здравствует Бордо, наш друг!

XLVII

Огонь потух; едва золою
Подернут уголь золотой;
Едва заметною струею
Виется пар, и теплотой
Камин чуть дышит. Дым из трубок
В трубу уходит. Светлый кубок
Еще шипит среди стола.
Вечерняя находит мгла…
(Люблю я дружеские враки
И дружеский бокал вина
Порою той, что названа
Пора меж волка и собаки,
А почему, не вижу я.)
Теперь беседуют друзья:

XLVIII

«Ну, что соседки? Что Татьяна?
Что Ольга резвая твоя?»
— Налей еще мне полстакана…
Довольно, милый… Вся семья
Здорова; кланяться велели.
Ах, милый, как похорошели
У Ольги плечи, что за грудь!
Что за душа!… Когда-нибудь
Заедем к ним; ты их обяжешь;
А то, мой друг, суди ты сам:
Два раза заглянул, а там
Уж к ним и носу не покажешь.
Да вот… какой же я болван!
Ты к ним на той неделе зван.

XLIX

«Я?» — Да, Татьяны именины
В субботу. Оленька и мать
Велели звать, и нет причины
Тебе на зов не приезжать. —
«Но куча будет там народу
И всякого такого сброду…»
— И, никого, уверен я!
Кто будет там? своя семья.
Поедем, сделай одолженье!
Ну, что ж? — «Согласен». — Как ты мил! —
При сих словах он осушил
Стакан, соседке приношенье,
Потом разговорился вновь
Про Ольгу: такова любовь!

L

Он весел был. Чрез две недели
Назначен был счастливый срок.
И тайна брачныя постели,
И сладостной любви венок
Его восторгов ожидали.
Гимена хлопоты, печали,
Зевоты хладная чреда
Ему не снились никогда.
Меж тем как мы, враги Гимена,
В домашней жизни зрим один
Ряд утомительных картин,
Роман во вкусе Лафонтена… 26
Мой бедный Ленский, сердцем он
Для оной жизни был рожден.

LI

Он был любим… по крайней мере
Так думал он, и был счастлив.
Стократ блажен, кто предан вере,
Кто, хладный ум угомонив,
Покоится в сердечной неге,
Как пьяный путник на ночлеге,
Или, нежней, как мотылек,
В весенний впившийся цветок;
Но жалок тот, кто все предвидит,
Чья не кружится голова,
Кто все движенья, все слова
В их переводе ненавидит,
Чье сердце опыт остудил
И забываться запретил!
Alexander Pushkin
0

Tags: Alexander Pushkin / Alexander Pushkin - Eugene Onegin
Add comment

Add comment

reload, if the code cannot be seen