Alexander Pushkin - Eugene Onegin (Chapter 2) / Евгений Онегин (2 часть)


in English

I

The place where Eugene loathed his leisure
was an enchanting country nook:
there any friend of harmless pleasure
would bless the form his fortune took.
The manor house, in deep seclusion,
screened by a hill from storm's intrusion,
looked on a river: far away
before it was the golden play
of light that flowering fields reflected:
villages flickered far and near,
and cattle roamed the plain, and here
a park, enormous and neglected,
spread out its shadow all around --
the pensive Dryads' hiding-ground.

II

The chateau was of a construction
befitting such a noble pile:
it stood, defiant of destruction
in sensible old-fashioned style.
High ceilings everywhere abounded;
in the saloon, brocade-surrounded,
ancestral1 portraits met the view
and stoves with tiles of various hue.
All this has now gone out of fashion,
I don't know why, but for my friend
interior decor in the end
excited not a hint of passion:
a modish taste, a dowdy touch --
both set him yawning just as much.

III

The rustic sage, in that apartment,
forty years long would criticise
his housekeeper and her department
look through the pane, and squash the flies.
Oak-floored, and simple as a stable:
two cupboards, one divan, a table,
no trace of ink, no spots, no stains.
And of the cupboards, one contains
a book of household calculations,
the other, jugs of applejack,
fruit liqueurs and an Almanack
for 1808: his obligations
had left the squire no time to look
at any other sort of book.

IV

Alone amid all his possessions,
to pass the time was Eugene's theme:
it led him, in these early sessions,
to institute a new regime.
A thinker in a desert mission,
he changed the corvee of tradition
into a small quit-rent -- and got
his serfs rejoicing at their lot.
But, in a fearful huff, his thrifty
neighbour was sure, from this would flow
consequences of hideous woe;
another's grin was sly and shifty,
but all concurred that, truth to speak,
he was a menace, and a freak.

V

At first they called; but on perceiving
invariably, as time went on,
that from the backdoor he'd be leaving
on a fast stallion from the Don,
once on the highway he'd detected
the noise their rustic wheels projected --
they took offence at this, and broke
relations off, and never spoke.
``The man's a boor; his brain is missing,
he's a freemason too; for him,
red wine in tumblers to the brim --
but ladies' hands are not for kissing;
it's yes or no, but never sir.''
The vote was passed without demur.

VI

Meanwhile another new landowner
came driving to his country seat,
and, in the district, this persona
drew scrutiny no less complete --
Vladimir Lensky, whose creator
was Gottingen, his alma mater,
good-looking, in the flower of age,
a poet, and a Kantian sage.
He'd brought back all the fruits of learning
from German realms of mist and steam,
freedom's enthusiastic dream,
a spirit strange, a spirit burning,
an eloquence of fevered strength,
and raven curls of shoulder-length.

VII

He was too young to have been blighted
by the cold world's corrupt finesse;
his soul still blossomed out, and lighted
at a friend's word, a girl's caress.
In heart's affairs, a sweet beginner,
he fed on hope's deceptive dinner;
the world's eclat, its thunder-roll,
still captivated his young soul.
He sweetened up with fancy's icing
the uncertainties within his heart;
for him, the objective on life's chart
was still mysterious and enticing --
something to rack his brains about,
suspecting wonders would come out.

VIII

He was convinced, a kindred creature
would be allied to him by fate;
that, meanwhile, pinched and glum of feature,
from day to day she could but wait;
and he believed his friends were ready
to put on chains for him, and steady
their hand to grapple slander's cup,
in his defence, and smash it up;
< that there existed, for the indulgence
of human friendship, holy men,
immortals picked by fate for when,
with irresistible refulgence,
their breed would (some years after this)
shine out and bring the world to bliss. >2

IX

Compassion, yes, and indignation,
honest devotion to the good,
bitter-sweet glory's inspiration,
already stirred him as they should.
He roamed the world, his lyre behind him;
Schiller and Goethe had refined him,
and theirs was the poetic flame
that fired his soul, to burn the same;
the Muses' lofty arts and fashions,
fortunate one, he'd not disgrace;
but in his songs kept pride of place
for the sublime, and for the passions
of virgin fancy, and again
the charm of what was grave and plain.

X

He sang of love, to love subjected,
his song was limpid in its tune
as infant sleep, or the unaffected
thoughts of a girl, or as the moon
through heaven's expanse serenely flying,
that queen of secrets and of sighing.
He sang of grief and parting-time,
of something vague, some misty clime;
roses romantically blowing;
of many distant lands he sang
where in the heart of silence rang
his sobs, where his live tears were flowing;
he sang of lifetime's yellowed page --
when not quite eighteen years of age.

XI

But in that desert his attainments
only to Eugene showed their worth;
Lensky disliked the entertainments
of neighbouring owners of the earth --
he fled from their resounding chatter!
Their talk, so sound on every matter,
on liquor, and on hay brought in,
on kennels, and on kith and kin,
it had no sparkle of sensation,
it lacked, of course, poetic heart,
sharpness of wit, and social art,
and logic; yet the conversation
upon the side of the distaff --
that was less clever still by half.

XII

Vladimir, wealthy and good-looking,
was asked around as quite a catch --
such is the usual country cooking;
and all the neighbours planned a match
between their girls and this half-Russian.
As soon as he appears, discussion
touches obliquely, but with speed,
on the dull life that bachelors lead;
and then it's tea that comes to mention,
and Dunya works the samovar;
and soon they bring her... a guitar
and whisper ``Dunya, pay attention!''
then, help me God, she caterwauls:
``Come to me in my golden halls.''

XIII

Lensky of course was quite untainted
by any itch for marriage ties;
instead the chance to get acquainted
with Eugene proved a tempting prize.
So, verse and prose, they came together.
No ice and flame, no stormy weather
and granite, were so far apart.
At first, disparity of heart
rendered them tedious to each other;
then liking grew, then every day
they met on horseback; quickly they
became like brother knit to brother.
Friendship, as I must own to you,
blooms when there's nothing else to do.

XIV

But friendship, as between our heroes,
can't really be: for we've outgrown
old prejudice; all men are zeros,
the units are ourselves alone.
Napoleon's our sole inspiration;
the millions of two-legged creation
for us are instruments and tools;
feeling is quaint, and fit for fools.
More tolerant in his conception
than most. Evgeny, though he knew
and scorned his fellows through and through,
yet, as each rule has its exception,
people there were he glorified,
feelings he valued -- from outside.

XV

He smiled as Lensky talked: the heady
perfervid language of the bard,
his mind, in judgement still unsteady,
and always the inspired regard --
to Eugene all was new and thrilling;
he struggled to bite back the chilling
word on his lips, and thought: it's sheer
folly for me to interfere
with such a blissful, brief infection --
even without me it will sink;
but meanwhile let him live, and think
the universe is all perfection;
youth is a fever; we must spare
its natural right to rave and flare.

XVI

Between them, every topic started
reflection or provoked dispute:
treaties of nations long departed,
and good and ill, and learning's fruit,
the prejudices of the ages,
the secrets of the grave, the pages
of fate, and life, each in its turn
became their scrutiny's concern.
In the white heat of some dissension
the abstracted poet would bring forth
fragments of poems from the North,
which, listening with some condescension,
the tolerant Evgeny heard --
but scarcely understood a word.

XVII

But it was passion that preempted
the thoughts of my two anchorites.
From that rough spell at last exempted,
Onegin spoke about its flights
with sighs unconsciously regretful.
Happy is he who's known its fretful
empire, and fled it; happier still
is he who's never felt its will,
he who has cooled down love with parting,
and hate with malice; he whose life
is yawned away with friends and wife
untouched by envy's bitter smarting,
who on a deuce, that famous cheat,
has never staked his family seat.

XVIII

When we've retreated to the banner
of calm and reason, when the flame
of passion's out, and its whole manner
become a joke to us, its game,
its wayward tricks, its violent surging,
its echoes, its belated urging,
reduced to sense, not without pain --
we sometimes like to hear again
passion's rough language talked by others,
and feel once more emotion's ban.
So a disabled soldier-man,
retired, forgotten by his brothers,
in his small shack, will listen well
to tales that young moustachios tell.

XIX

But it's the talent for concealing
that ardent youth entirely lacks;
hate, love, joy, sorrow -- every feeling,
it blabs, and spills them in its tracks.
As, lovingly, in his confession,
the poet's heart found full expression,
Eugene, with solemn face, paid heed,
and felt himself love's invalide.
Lensky ingenuously related
his conscience's record, and so
Onegin swiftly came to know
his tale of youthful love, narrated
with deep emotion through and through,
to us, though, not exactly new.

XX

Ah, he had loved a love that never
is known today; only a soul
that raves with poetry can ever
be doomed to feel it: there's one goal
perpetually, one goal for dreaming,
one customary object gleaming,
one customary grief each hour!
not separation's chilling power,
no years of absence past returning,
no beauties of a foreign clime,
no noise of gaiety, no time
devoted to the Muse, or learning,
nothing could alter or could tire
this soul that glowed with virgin fire.

XXI

Since earliest boyhood he had doted
on Olga; from heart's ache still spared,
with tenderness he'd watched and noted
her girlhood games; in them he'd shared,
by deep and shady woods protected;
the crown of marriage was projected
for them by fathers who, as friends
and neighbours, followed the same ends.
Away inside that unassuming
homestead, before her parents' gaze,
she blossomed in the graceful ways
of innocence: a lily blooming
in deepest grasses, quite alone,
to bee and butterfly unknown.

XXII

And our young poet -- Olga fired him
in his first dream of passion's fruit,
and thoughts of her were what inspired him
to the first meanings of his flute.
Farewell the games of golden childhood!
he fell in love with darkest wildwood,
solitude, stillness and the night,
the stars, the moon -- celestial light
to which so oft we've dedicated
those walks amid the gloom and calm
of evening, and those tears, the balm
of secret pain... but it's now rated
by judgement of the modern camp
almost as good as a dim lamp.

XXIII

Full of obedience and demureness,
as gay as morning and as clear,
poetic in her simple pureness,
sweet as a lover's kiss, and dear,
in Olga everything expresses --
the skyblue eyes, the flaxen tresses,
smile, voice and movements, little waist --
take any novel, clearly traced
you're sure to find her portrait in it:
a portrait with a charming touch;
once I too liked it very much;
but now it bores me every minute.
Reader, the elder sister now
must be my theme, if you'll allow.

XXIV

Tatyana3 was her name... I own it,
self-willed it may be just the same;
but it's the first time you'll have known it,
a novel graced with such a name.
What of it? it's euphonious, pleasant,
and yet inseparably present,
I know it, in the thoughts of all
are old times, and the servants' hall.
We must confess that taste deserts us
even in our names (and how much worse
when we begin to talk of verse);
culture, so far from healing, hurts us;
what it's transported to our shore
is mincing manners -- nothing more.

XXV

So she was called Tatyana. Truly
she lacked her sister's beauty, lacked
the rosy bloom that glowed so newly
to catch the eye and to attract.
Shy as a savage, silent, tearful,
wild as a forest deer, and fearful,
Tatyana had a changeling look
in her own home. She never took
to kissing or caressing father
or mother; and in all the play
of children, though as young as they,
she never joined, or skipped, but rather
in silence all day she'd remain
ensconced beside the window-pane.

XXVI

Reflection was her friend and pleasure
right from the cradle of her days;
it touched with reverie her leisure,
adorning all its country ways.
Her tender touch had never fingered
the needle, never had she lingered
to liven with a silk atour
the linen stretched on the tambour.
Sign of the urge for domination:
in play with her obedient doll
the child prepares for protocol --
that corps of social legislation --
and to it, with a grave import,
repeats what her mama has taught.

XXVII

Tatyana had no dolls to dandle,
not even in her earliest age;
she'd never tell them news or scandal
or novelties from fashion's page.
Tatyana never knew the attraction
of childish pranks: a chilled reaction
to horror-stories told at night
in winter was her heart's delight.
Whenever nyanya had collected
for Olga, on the spreading lawn,
her little friends, Tatyana'd yawn,
she'd never join the game selected,
for she was bored by laughs and noise
and by the sound of silly joys.

XXVIII

She loved the balcony, the session
of waiting for the dawn to blush,
when, in pale sky, the stars' procession
fades from the view, and in the hush
earth's rim grows light, and a forewarning
whisper of breeze announces morning,
and slowly day begins to climb.
In winter, when for longer time
the shades of night within their keeping
hold half the world still unreleased,
and when, by misty moon, the east
is softly, indolently sleeping,
wakened at the same hour of night
Tatyana'd rise by candlelight.

XXIX

From early on she loved romances,
they were her only food... and so
she fell in love with all the fancies
of Richardson and of Rousseau.
Her father, kindly, well-regarded,
but in an earlier age retarded,
could see no harm in books; himself
he never took one from the shelf,
thought them a pointless peccadillo;
and cared not what his daughter kept
by way of secret tome that slept
until the dawn beneath her pillow.
His wife, just like Tatyana, had
on Richardson gone raving mad.

XXX

And not because she'd read him, either,
and not because she'd once preferred
Lovelace, or Grandison, or neither;
but in the old days she had heard
about them -- nineteen to the dozen --
so often from her Moscow cousin
Princess Alina. She was still
engaged then -- but against her will;
loved someone else, not her intended,
someone towards whose heart and mind
her feelings were far more inclined --
this Grandison of hers was splendid,
a fop, a punter on the cards,
and junior Ensign in the Guards.

XXXI

She was like him and always sported
the latest fashions of the town;
but, without asking, they transported
her to the altar and the crown.
The better to dispel her sorrow
her clever husband on the morrow
took her to his estate, where she,
at first, with God knows whom to see,
in tears and violent tossing vented
her grief, and nearly ran away.
Then, plunged in the housekeeper's day,
she grew accustomed, and contented.
In stead of happiness, say I,
custom's bestowed us from on high.

XXXII

For it was custom that consoled her
in grief that nothing else could mend;
soon a great truth came to enfold her
and give her comfort to the end:
she found, in labours and in leisure,
the secret of her husband's measure,
and ruled him like an autocrat --
so all went smoothly after that.
Mushrooms in brine, for winter eating,
fieldwork directed from the path,
accounts, shaved forelocks,4 Sunday bath;
meantime she'd give the maids a beating
if her cross mood was at its worst --
but never asked her husband first.

XXXIII

No, soon she changed her old demeanour:
girls' albums, signed in blood for choice;
Praskovya re-baptized ``Polina'';
conversing in a singsong voice;
lacing her stays up very tightly;
pronouncing through her nose politely
the Russian N, like N in French;
soon all that went without a wrench:
album and stays, Princess Alina,
sentiment, notebook, verses, all
she quite forgot -- began to call
``Akulka'' the onetime Selina,
and introduced, for the last lap,
a quilted chamber-robe and cap.

XXXIV

Her loving spouse with approbation
left her to follow her own line,
trusted her without hesitation,
and wore his dressing-gown to dine.
His life went sailing in calm weather;
sometimes the evening brought together
neighbours and friends in kindly group,
a plain, unceremonious troop,
for grumbling, gossiping and swearing
and for a chuckle or a smile.
The evening passes, and meanwhile
here's tea that Olga's been preparing;
after that, supper's served, and so
bed-time, and time for guests to go.

XXXV

Throughout their life, so calm, so peaceful,
sweet old tradition was preserved:
for them, in Butterweek5 the greaseful,
Russian pancakes were always served;
< ...
... >2
they needed kvas like air; at table
their guests, for all they ate and drank,
were served in order of their rank.

XXXVI

And so they lived, two ageing mortals,
till he at last was summoned down
into the tomb's wide open portals,
and once again received a crown.
Just before dinner, from his labours
he rested -- wept for by his neighbours,
his children and his faithful wife,
far more than most who leave this life.
He was a good and simple barin;6
above the dust of his remains
the funeral monument explains:
``A humble sinner, Dimitry Larin,
beneath the stone reposes here,
servant of God, and Brigadier.''

XXXVII

Lensky, restored to his manorial
penates, came to cast an eye
over his neighbour's plain memorial,
and offer to that ash a sigh;
sadly he mourned for the departed.
``Poor Yorick,'' said he, broken-hearted:
``he dandled me as a small boy.
How many times I made a toy
of his Ochakov7 decoration!
He destined Olga's hand for me,
kept asking: "shall I live to see"...''
so, full of heart-felt tribulation,
Lensky composed in autograph
a madrigal for epitaph.

XXXVIII

There too, he honoured, hotly weeping,
his parents' patriarchal dust
with lines to mark where they were sleeping...
Alas! the generations must,
as fate's mysterious purpose burrows,
reap a brief harvest on their furrows;
they rise and ripen and fall dead:
others will follow where they tread...
and thus our race, so fluctuating,
grows, surges, boils, for lack of room
presses its forebears to the tomb.
We too shall find our hour is waiting;
it will be our descendants who
out of this world will crowd us too.

XXXIX

So glut yourselves until you're sated
on this unstable life, my friends!
its nullity I've always hated,
I know too surely how it ends.
I'm blind to every apparition;
and yet a distant admonition
of hope sometimes disturbs my heart;
it would be painful to depart
and leave no faint footprint of glory...
I never lived or wrote for praise;
yet how I wish that I might raise
to high renown my doleful story,
that there be just one voice which came,
like a true friend, to speak my name.

XL

And someone's heart will feel a quiver,
for maybe fortune will have saved
from drowning's death in Lethe river
the strophe over which I slaved;
perhaps -- for flattering hope will linger --
some future dunce will point a finger
at my famed portrait and will say:
he was a poet in his day.
I thank him without reservation,
the peaceful Muses' devotee,
whose memory will preserve for me
the fleeting works of my creation,
whose kindly hand will ruffle down
the laurel in the old man's crown!

Notes to Chapter Two

1 Pushkin first wrote ``imperial portraits''; but this he later altered
``for reasons of censorship'' because, as Nabokov explains, ``tsars were not
to be mentioned in so offhand a way''.
2 Lines discarded by Pushkin.
3 ``Sweet-sounding Greek names like Agathon... etc., are only current
in Russia among the common people.'' Pushkin's note.
4 Serfs chosen as recruits for the army had their forelock cut off.
5 The week before Lent.
6 Gentleman, squire.
7 Fortress captured from the Turks in 1788.

in Russian

I

Деревня, где скучал Евгений,
Была прелестный уголок;
Там друг невинных наслаждений
Благословить бы небо мог.
Господский дом уединенный,
Горой от ветров огражденный,
Стоял над речкою. Вдали
Пред ним пестрели и цвели
Луга и нивы золотые,
Мелькали селы; здесь и там
Стада бродили по лугам,
И сени расширял густые
Огромный, запущенный сад,
Приют задумчивых дриад.

II

Почтенный замок был построен,
Как замки строиться должны:
Отменно прочен и спокоен
Во вкусе умной старины.
Везде высокие покои,
В гостиной штофные обои,
Царей портреты на стенах,
И печи в пестрых изразцах.
Все это ныне обветшало,
Не знаю, право, почему;
Да, впрочем, другу моему
В том нужды было очень мало,
Затем, что он равно зевал
Средь модных и старинных зал.

III

Он в том покое поселился,
Где деревенский старожил
Лет сорок с ключницей бранился,
В окно смотрел и мух давил.
Все было просто: пол дубовый,
Два шкафа, стол, диван пуховый,
Нигде ни пятнышка чернил.
Онегин шкафы отворил;
В одном нашел тетрадь расхода,
В другом наливок целый строй,
Кувшины с яблочной водой
И календарь осьмого года:
Старик, имея много дел,
В иные книги не глядел.

IV

Один среди своих владений,
Чтоб только время проводить,
Сперва задумал наш Евгений
Порядок новый учредить.
В своей глуши мудрец пустынный,
Ярем он барщины старинной
Оброком легким заменил;
И раб судьбу благословил.
Зато в углу своем надулся,
Увидя в этом страшный вред,
Его расчетливый сосед;
Другой лукаво улыбнулся,
И в голос все решили так,
Что он опаснейший чудак.

V

Сначала все к нему езжали;
Но так как с заднего крыльца
Обыкновенно подавали
Ему донского жеребца,
Лишь только вдоль большой дороги
Заслышат их домашни дроги, —
Поступком оскорбясь таким,
Все дружбу прекратили с ним.
«Сосед наш неуч; сумасбродит;
Он фармазон; он пьет одно
Стаканом красное вино;
Он дамам к ручке не подходит;
Все да да нет; не скажет да-с
Иль нет-с». Таков был общий глас.

VI

В свою деревню в ту же пору
Помещик новый прискакал
И столь же строгому разбору
В соседстве повод подавал:
По имени Владимир Ленской,
С душою прямо геттингенской,
Красавец, в полном цвете лет,
Поклонник Канта и поэт.
Он из Германии туманной
Привез учености плоды:
Вольнолюбивые мечты,
Дух пылкий и довольно странный,
Всегда восторженную речь
И кудри черные до плеч.

VII

От хладного разврата света
Еще увянуть не успев,
Его душа была согрета
Приветом друга, лаской дев;
Он сердцем милый был невежда,
Его лелеяла надежда,
И мира новый блеск и шум
Еще пленяли юный ум.
Он забавлял мечтою сладкой
Сомненья сердца своего;
Цель жизни нашей для него
Была заманчивой загадкой,
Над ней он голову ломал
И чудеса подозревал.

VIII

Он верил, что душа родная
Соединиться с ним должна,
Что, безотрадно изнывая,
Его вседневно ждет она;
Он верил, что друзья готовы
За честь его приять оковы
И что не дрогнет их рука
Разбить сосуд клеветника;
Что есть избранные судьбами,
Людей священные друзья;
Что их бессмертная семья
Неотразимыми лучами
Когда-нибудь нас озарит
И мир блаженством одарит.

IX

Негодованье, сожаленье,
Ко благу чистая любовь
И славы сладкое мученье
В нем рано волновали кровь.
Он с лирой странствовал на свете;
Под небом Шиллера и Гете
Их поэтическим огнем
Душа воспламенилась в нем;
И муз возвышенных искусства,
Счастливец, он не постыдил:
Он в песнях гордо сохранил
Всегда возвышенные чувства,
Порывы девственной мечты
И прелесть важной простоты.

X

Он пел любовь, любви послушный,
И песнь его была ясна,
Как мысли девы простодушной,
Как сон младенца, как луна
В пустынях неба безмятежных,
Богиня тайн и вздохов нежных.
Он пел разлуку и печаль,
И нечто, и туманну даль,
И романтические розы;
Он пел те дальные страны,
Где долго в лоно тишины
Лились его живые слезы;
Он пел поблеклый жизни цвет
Без малого в осьмнадцать лет.

XI

В пустыне, где один Евгений
Мог оценить его дары,
Господ соседственных селений
Ему не нравились пиры;
Бежал он их беседы шумной.
Их разговор благоразумный
О сенокосе, о вине,
О псарне, о своей родне,
Конечно, не блистал ни чувством,
Ни поэтическим огнем,
Ни остротою, ни умом,
Ни общежития искусством;
Но разговор их милых жен
Гораздо меньше был умен.

XII

Богат, хорош собою, Ленский
Везде был принят как жених;
Таков обычай деревенский;
Все дочек прочили своих
За полурусского соседа;
Взойдет ли он, тотчас беседа
Заводит слово стороной
О скуке жизни холостой;
Зовут соседа к самовару,
А Дуня разливает чай;
Ей шепчут: «Дуня, примечай!»
Потом приносят и гитару:
И запищит она (бог мой!):
Приди в чертог ко мне златой!.. 12

XIII

Но Ленский, не имев, конечно,
Охоты узы брака несть,
С Онегиным желал сердечно
Знакомство покороче свесть.
Они сошлись. Волна и камень,
Стихи и проза, лед и пламень
Не столь различны меж собой.
Сперва взаимной разнотой
Они друг другу были скучны;
Потом понравились; потом
Съезжались каждый день верхом
И скоро стали неразлучны.
Так люди (первый каюсь я)
От делать нечего друзья.

XIV

Но дружбы нет и той меж нами.
Все предрассудки истребя,
Мы почитаем всех нулями,
А единицами — себя.
Мы все глядим в Наполеоны;
Двуногих тварей миллионы
Для нас орудие одно;
Нам чувство дико и смешно.
Сноснее многих был Евгений;
Хоть он людей, конечно, знал
И вообще их презирал, —
Но (правил нет без исключений)
Иных он очень отличал
И вчуже чувство уважал.

XV

Он слушал Ленского с улыбкой.
Поэта пылкий разговор,
И ум, еще в сужденьях зыбкой,
И вечно вдохновенный взор, —
Онегину все было ново;
Он охладительное слово
В устах старался удержать
И думал: глупо мне мешать
Его минутному блаженству;
И без меня пора придет;
Пускай покамест он живет
Да верит мира совершенству;
Простим горячке юных лет
И юный жар и юный бред.

XVI

Меж ими все рождало споры
И к размышлению влекло:
Племен минувших договоры,
Плоды наук, добро и зло,
И предрассудки вековые,
И гроба тайны роковые,
Судьба и жизнь в свою чреду,
Все подвергалось их суду.
Поэт в жару своих суждений
Читал, забывшись, между тем
Отрывки северных поэм,
И снисходительный Евгений,
Хоть их не много понимал,
Прилежно юноше внимал.

XVII

Но чаще занимали страсти
Умы пустынников моих.
Ушед от их мятежной власти,
Онегин говорил об них
С невольным вздохом сожаленья:
Блажен, кто ведал их волненья
И наконец от них отстал;
Блаженней тот, кто их не знал,
Кто охлаждал любовь — разлукой,
Вражду — злословием; порой
Зевал с друзьями и с женой,
Ревнивой не тревожась мукой,
И дедов верный капитал
Коварной двойке не вверял.

XVIII

Когда прибегнем мы под знамя
Благоразумной тишины,
Когда страстей угаснет пламя,
И нам становятся смешны
Их своевольство иль порывы
И запоздалые отзывы, —
Смиренные не без труда,
Мы любим слушать иногда
Страстей чужих язык мятежный,
И нам он сердце шевелит.
Так точно старый инвалид
Охотно клонит слух прилежный
Рассказам юных усачей,
Забытый в хижине своей.

XIX

Зато и пламенная младость
Не может ничего скрывать.
Вражду, любовь, печаль и радость
Она готова разболтать.
В любви считаясь инвалидом,
Онегин слушал с важным видом,
Как, сердца исповедь любя,
Поэт высказывал себя;
Свою доверчивую совесть
Он простодушно обнажал.
Евгений без труда узнал
Его любви младую повесть,
Обильный чувствами рассказ,
Давно не новыми для нас.

XX

Ах, он любил, как в наши лета
Уже не любят; как одна
Безумная душа поэта
Еще любить осуждена:
Всегда, везде одно мечтанье,
Одно привычное желанье,
Одна привычная печаль.
Ни охлаждающая даль,
Ни долгие лета разлуки,
Ни музам данные часы,
Ни чужеземные красы,
Ни шум веселий, ни науки
Души не изменили в нем,
Согретой девственным огнем.

XXI

Чуть отрок, Ольгою плененный,
Сердечных мук еще не знав,
Он был свидетель умиленный
Ее младенческих забав;
В тени хранительной дубравы
Он разделял ее забавы,
И детям прочили венцы
Друзья-соседы, их отцы.
В глуши, под сению смиренной,
Невинной прелести полна,
В глазах родителей, она
Цвела, как ландыш потаенный,
Незнаемый в траве глухой
Ни мотыльками, ни пчелой.

XXII

Она поэту подарила
Младых восторгов первый сон,
И мысль об ней одушевила
Его цевницы первый стон.
Простите, игры золотые!
Он рощи полюбил густые,
Уединенье, тишину,
И ночь, и звезды, и луну,
Луну, небесную лампаду,
Которой посвящали мы
Прогулки средь вечерней тьмы,
И слезы, тайных мук отраду…
Но нынче видим только в ней
Замену тусклых фонарей.

XXIII

Всегда скромна, всегда послушна,
Всегда как утро весела,
Как жизнь поэта простодушна,
Как поцелуй любви мила;
Глаза, как небо, голубые,
Улыбка, локоны льняные,
Движенья, голос, легкий стан,
Всё в Ольге… но любой роман
Возьмите и найдете верно
Ее портрет: он очень мил,
Я прежде сам его любил,
Но надоел он мне безмерно.
Позвольте мне, читатель мой,
Заняться старшею сестрой.

XXIV

Ее сестра звалась Татьяна… 13
Впервые именем таким
Страницы нежные романа
Мы своевольно освятим.
И что ж? оно приятно, звучно;
Но с ним, я знаю, неразлучно
Воспоминанье старины
Иль девичьей! Мы все должны
Признаться: вкусу очень мало
У нас и в наших именах
(Не говорим уж о стихах);
Нам просвещенье не пристало,
И нам досталось от него
Жеманство, — больше ничего.

XXV

Итак, она звалась Татьяной.
Ни красотой сестры своей,
Ни свежестью ее румяной
Не привлекла б она очей.
Дика, печальна, молчалива,
Как лань лесная боязлива,
Она в семье своей родной
Казалась девочкой чужой.
Она ласкаться не умела
К отцу, ни к матери своей;
Дитя сама, в толпе детей
Играть и прыгать не хотела
И часто целый день одна
Сидела молча у окна.

XXVI

Задумчивость, ее подруга
От самых колыбельных дней,
Теченье сельского досуга
Мечтами украшала ей.
Ее изнеженные пальцы
Не знали игл; склонясь на пяльцы,
Узором шелковым она
Не оживляла полотна.
Охоты властвовать примета,
С послушной куклою дитя
Приготовляется шутя
К приличию — закону света,
И важно повторяет ей
Уроки маменьки своей.

XXVII

Но куклы даже в эти годы
Татьяна в руки не брала;
Про вести города, про моды
Беседы с нею не вела.
И были детские проказы
Ей чужды: страшные рассказы
Зимою в темноте ночей
Пленяли больше сердце ей.
Когда же няня собирала
Для Ольги на широкий луг
Всех маленьких ее подруг,
Она в горелки не играла,
Ей скучен был и звонкий смех,
И шум их ветреных утех.

XXVIII

Она любила на балконе
Предупреждать зари восход,
Когда на бледном небосклоне
Звезд исчезает хоровод,
И тихо край земли светлеет,
И, вестник утра, ветер веет,
И всходит постепенно день.
Зимой, когда ночная тень
Полмиром доле обладает,
И доле в праздной тишине,
При отуманенной луне,
Восток ленивый почивает,
В привычный час пробуждена
Вставала при свечах она.

XXIX

Ей рано нравились романы;
Они ей заменяли всё;
Она влюблялася в обманы
И Ричардсона и Руссо.
Отец ее был добрый малый,
В прошедшем веке запоздалый;
Но в книгах не видал вреда;
Он, не читая никогда,
Их почитал пустой игрушкой
И не заботился о том,
Какой у дочки тайный том
Дремал до утра под подушкой.
Жена ж его была сама
От Ричардсона без ума.

XXX

Она любила Ричардсона
Не потому, чтобы прочла,
Не потому, чтоб Грандисона
Она Ловласу предпочла; 14
Но в старину княжна Алина,
Ее московская кузина,
Твердила часто ей об них.
В то время был еще жених
Ее супруг, но по неволе;
Она вздыхала по другом,
Который сердцем и умом
Ей нравился гораздо боле:
Сей Грандисон был славный франт,
Игрок и гвардии сержант.

XXXI

Как он, она была одета
Всегда по моде и к лицу;
Но, не спросясь ее совета,
Девицу повезли к венцу.
И, чтоб ее рассеять горе,
Разумный муж уехал вскоре
В свою деревню, где она,
Бог знает кем окружена,
Рвалась и плакала сначала,
С супругом чуть не развелась;
Потом хозяйством занялась,
Привыкла и довольна стала.
Привычка свыше нам дана:
Замена счастию она 15.

XXXII

Привычка усладила горе,
Не отразимое ничем;
Открытие большое вскоре
Ее утешило совсем:
Она меж делом и досугом
Открыла тайну, как супругом
Самодержавно управлять,
И все тогда пошло на стать.
Она езжала по работам,
Солила на зиму грибы,
Вела расходы, брила лбы,
Ходила в баню по субботам,
Служанок била осердясь —
Все это мужа не спросясь.

XXXIII

Бывало, писывала кровью
Она в альбомы нежных дев,
Звала Полиною Прасковью
И говорила нараспев,
Корсет носила очень узкий,
И русский Н как N французский
Произносить умела в нос;
Но скоро все перевелось:
Корсет, альбом, княжну Алину,
Стишков чувствительных тетрадь
Она забыла: стала звать
Акулькой прежнюю Селину
И обновила наконец
На вате шлафор и чепец.

XXXIV

Но муж любил ее сердечно,
В ее затеи не входил,
Во всем ей веровал беспечно,
А сам в халате ел и пил;
Покойно жизнь его катилась;
Под вечер иногда сходилась
Соседей добрая семья,
Нецеремонные друзья,
И потужить, и позлословить,
И посмеяться кой о чем.
Проходит время; между тем
Прикажут Ольге чай готовить,
Там ужин, там и спать пора,
И гости едут со двора.

XXXV

Они хранили в жизни мирной
Привычки милой старины;
У них на масленице жирной
Водились русские блины;
Два раза в год они говели;
Любили круглые качели,
Подблюдны песни, хоровод;
В день Троицын, когда народ,
Зевая, слушает молебен,
Умильно на пучок зари
Они роняли слезки три;
Им квас как воздух был потребен,
И за столом у них гостям
Носили блюды по чинам.

XXXVI

И так они старели оба.
И отворились наконец
Перед супругом двери гроба,
И новый он приял венец.
Он умер в час перед обедом,
Оплаканный своим соседом,
Детьми и верною женой
Чистосердечней, чем иной.
Он был простой и добрый барин,
И там, где прах его лежит,
Надгробный памятник гласит:
Смиренный грешник, Дмитрий Ларин,
Господний раб и бригадир,
Под камнем сим вкушает мир.

XXXVII

Своим пенатам возвращенный,
Владимир Ленский посетил
Соседа памятник смиренный,
И вздох он пеплу посвятил;
И долго сердцу грустно было.
«Poor Yorick! 16 — молвил он уныло. —
Он на руках меня держал.
Как часто в детстве я играл
Его Очаковской медалью!
Он Ольгу прочил за меня,
Он говорил: дождусь ли дня?..»
И, полный искренней печалью,
Владимир тут же начертал
Ему надгробный мадригал.

XXXVIII

И там же надписью печальной
Отца и матери, в слезах,
Почтил он прах патриархальный…
Увы! на жизненных браздах
Мгновенной жатвой поколенья,
По тайной воле провиденья,
Восходят, зреют и падут;
Другие им вослед идут…
Так наше ветреное племя
Растет, волнуется, кипит
И к гробу прадедов теснит.
Придет, придет и наше время,
И наши внуки в добрый час
Из мира вытеснят и нас!

XXXIX

Покамест упивайтесь ею,
Сей легкой жизнию, друзья!
Ее ничтожность разумею
И мало к ней привязан я;
Для призраков закрыл я вежды;
Но отдаленные надежды
Тревожат сердце иногда:
Без неприметного следа
Мне было б грустно мир оставить.
Живу, пишу не для похвал;
Но я бы, кажется, желал
Печальный жребий свой прославить,
Чтоб обо мне, как верный друг,
Напомнил хоть единый звук.

XL

И чье-нибудь он сердце тронет;
И, сохраненная судьбой,
Быть может, в Лете не потонет
Строфа, слагаемая мной;
Быть может (лестная надежда!),
Укажет будущий невежда
На мой прославленный портрет
И молвит: то-то был поэт!
Прими ж мои благодаренья,
Поклонник мирных аонид,
О ты, чья память сохранит
Мои летучие творенья,
Чья благосклонная рука
Потреплет лавры старика!
Alexander Pushkin
0

Tags: Alexander Pushkin / Alexander Pushkin - Eugene Onegin
Add comment

Add comment

reload, if the code cannot be seen